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Hadrian's Triumph- Inscription from a triumphal arch

UnknownRoman period, 136 CE

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
Jerusalem, Israel

Sections of a monumental Latin inscription – the largest ever found in Israel – were discovered near the camp of the Sixth Legion in Tel Shalem. The inscription had been part of a triumphal arch built in 136 CE in honor of the emperor Hadrian, presumably commemorating the suppression of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. The impressive dimensions of the inscription, the quality of the engraving, and the use of Latin all indicate that the construction of the arch was an imperial initiative. Exactly why the arch was erected in this location is still unknown.IMP. CAES. DIVI. TRAIANI. PAR. THICIF. DIVI. NERVAE. TRAIANO. HADRIANO. AVG PONTIF. MAX. TR. POT. XVIIII. IMP. II. COS. III. P.P.S.P.Q.R

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  • Title: Hadrian's Triumph- Inscription from a triumphal arch
  • Creator: Unknown
  • Date Created: Roman period, 136 CE
  • Location: Tirat Zvi, Beth Shean Valley
  • Type: Inscription
  • Rights: Israel Antiquities Authority, Photo © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
  • External Link: Israel Museum, Jerusalem
  • Medium: Limestone
  • Inscription: IMP. CAES. DIVI. TRAIANI. PAR. THICIF. DIVI. NERVAE. TRAIANO. HADRIANO. AVG PONTIF. MAX. TR. POT. XVIIII. IMP. II. COS. III. P.P.S.P.Q.R
  • Dimensions: H: 119; W: 59; D: 19 cm
  • Curator: Mevorah, David

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