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Late-Qing-to-Republican-China Lacquer-handle Tuanshan Silk Fan Featuring Painting and Calligraphy Front

Arts & Crafts Museum Hangzhou

Arts & Crafts Museum Hangzhou
Hangzhou, China

The form of Chinese fans witnessed a significant change during the Han dynasty (202 BC-220 AD) when the guards on the two sides merged into one central axis, usually made of bamboo, supporting a moon-shaped panel. Such kind of fans gained the name “wanshan”, meaning “silk fan”, when silk fabric became a popular choice for the panel, but have been more known as “hehuan shan” or “tuanshan”, both meaning “reunion fan”, given their round shape in most cases. Tuanshan silk fans have evolved into not only a favorite accessory for women to stress their grace and beauty, but also a medium for the literati’s artistic creation such as painting and calligraphy.
On the silk panel of this fan, there is a colored birds and flowers painting on one side while an excerpt of the Stele Inscription by Shi Chen in clerical script on the other side coated with gold powder.

Details

  • Title: Late-Qing-to-Republican-China Lacquer-handle Tuanshan Silk Fan Featuring Painting and Calligraphy Front
  • Physical dimensions: Length: 41cm, width: 26cm
  • Dates: Late Qing to Republic of China

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