Andy Warhol: 6 works

A slideshow of artworks auto-selected from multiple collections

By Google Arts & Culture

Brillo (1988) by Andy WarholOlomouc Museum of Art

'The name of Andy Warhol, an artist of Slovak origin, is often regarded as a synonym of Pop Art. Among his works are found repeated series of pictures of consumer goods (Campbell soup cans, Coca Cola bottles) as well as of politicians and Pop Culture stars (Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley).'

Orange Car Crash (5 Deaths 11 Times in Orange) (Orange Disaster) ([1963]) by Andy WarholGalleria Civica di Arte Moderna e Contemporanea Torino

'At the end of the 1950s, Andy Warhol, who for some years had been devoted to painting alongside his work as an advertising designer, was struck by the New Dada of Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg and the first cries of Pop art. What attracted him was the procedure chosen by these artists, consisting in a brutal sampling of the most banal and ordinary reality, a process ideologically opposed to the gestural exuberance of Action Painting.'

Untitled from American Supermarket (ca. 1964) by Robert Marshall Watts; Andy Warhol; Billy AppleChrysler Museum of Art

'Warhol sold his cans for $18, and shopping bags silkscreened by Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein rung up for $12.'

Untitled (1975) by Andy WarholMAM Rio

'An icon of American Pop Art, Warhol used the images of celebrities in his works.'

Portrait of Jack Tanzer (1976/1976) by Andy WarholChrysler Museum of Art

'In late 1969 Warhol inaugurated Interview magazine as a hip forum for these newfound associates, and in the early seventies he began a highly lucrative series of portraits commissioned by his rich and famous clientele. Among the New York art establishment who sat for Warhol was a group of prominent art dealers and gallery owners that included Leo Castelli, Sidney Janis, and, as seen in the Chrysler portrait, Jack Tanzer.'

Mother and daughter: Tina and Lisa Bilotti (1981/1981) by Andy WarholMuseo Carlo Bilotti

'Tina and Lisa, wife and daughter of Carlo Bilotti, are portrayed by Andy Warhol in a rare double portrait, which has had happy stylistic results: the sideways pose of the figures, with their elegant elongated necks and the warm colours, accentuated by the matching colours of their lips, exalt the two faces, giving them a classical aspect, although at the same time they have an intimacy in which the mother predominates and protects her daughter.'

Credits: All media
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