The José María Lafragua Historial Library (BUAP) shares in this ocasion a selection of engravings created by the great representative artist of the Baroque, Rembrandt van Rijn. These etchings were printed in a revised edition in the 19th century by the french artist Julien Delangle using the original metal plates created by Rembrandt. It is still a mistery how and when this masterpiece became part of the collection of the State College of Puebla, educational institution predecessor of our university.

Rembrandt's engraving
Religious etchings, self portraits and portraits of Rembrandt's family
Rembrandt's religious etchings
This selection includes some samples of the Dutch painter using the chiaroscuro technique that he used in many other paintings of biblical scenes and characters (both Old and New Testament) and a few representations of Saint Jerome. The religious subject in Rembrandt’s artistic production is both significant and exceptional, since this type of work was unusual in protestant Holland of the 17th Century.

Holly Family, or the Virgin wahing

Holly Family, or the Virgin wahing

Presentation of Jesús at the Temple

Presentation of Jesús at the Temple

Presentation of Jesús at the Temple

Jesús among the Law Doctors

Jesús among the Law Doctors

The brief resurrection of Lazarus

The brief resurrection of Lazarus

The brief resurrection of Lazarus

Jesús in the Garden of Olives

The brief resurrection of Lazarus

Cross Downhill Torch

Cross Downhill Torch

Cross Downhill Torch

Jesus Christ carried to the tomb

Jesus Christ carried to the tomb

Jesus Christ carried to the tomb

For more Rembrandt's religious etchings click on the image

Rembrandt’s self portraits and portraits of his family
This group shows some of the etchings that the Dutch painter made of members of his family. The style he chose to represent them is quite different from the common practice used for domestic portraits in the 17th century: they were presented individually. Through the portraits of his mother, of Saskia (his wife) and Titus (his son), as well as the large set of self portraits, Rembrandt showed not only his technical ability but also the liberality in subject selection, priviledging truth and sincerity above beauty and harmony; he also privileged the anecdotal character of his artistic work.

Rembrand wearing a round hat and an embroidered coat

Rembrandt's wife, wearing headdress

Portrait of Titus Van Rijn, Rembrandt's son

Rembrandt wearing a smooth hat (Portrait of Rembrandt with short, curly hair)

For more Rembrandt’s self portraits and portraits of his family click on the image

Rembrandt van Rijn
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