Masterpieces of Chinese Ceramics from the Collection of the TFAM

Tokyo Fuji Art Museum

The art and craft of porcelain making was born in China some 10,000 years ago along the banks of the Yellow River, home to one of the world’s four great civilizations. The first to develop colored and ash-baked earthenware in the Neolithic era, Chinese potters would continue refining their skills, technical innovation and artistry over the millennia, creating everything from ash and lead glazed ceramics and white porcelain to delicate surface ornamentation and other “fine china” in various colors. ��As a result, China remains the undisputed leader in formative artworks. “Masterpieces of Chinese Ceramics from the Collection of the Tokyo Art Museum” features 125 pieces—including two very rare and priceless works—created during the first 4,500 years of China’s ceramic ascendancy from TFAM’s private holdings.

The 1st Chapter: From the Dawn of Chinese Pottery to the Appearance of Celadon
The 2nd Chapter: Fusion of Eastern and Western Cultures and Development of Colorful Ceramics
The 3rd Chapter: Maturity of Celadon and White Porcelain and Emergence of Colored Glaze
The 4th Chapter: Flourishing Colors and Patterns of Jingdezhen Ware
Credits: Story

Tokyo Fuji Art Museum

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