Italian style and excellence in Turin 

Palazzo Madama

 A collection of model certification folders form the National Independent Authority for Fashion

Celebrating Italian craftmanship

At the beginning of the XXth century, the fame of Turin as a capital of fashion was connected to the excellence of its commercial and manufacturing activities. Great Exhibitions stimulated competition on technological innovation, Paris was the landmark.

Born in Turin in 1932, the Ente Autonomo per la Moda Nazionale (National Independent Authority for Fashion), then National Agency of Fashion encouraged the development of an Italian style, independent from the French model.

Palazzo Madama has 70 model certification folders of the Turin feminine tailor’s shop Nebbia and Ghibaudo, with atelier in via Mario Gioda (now Via Giolitti) 5, divided into day, afternoon, midday and evening wear.

The Ente Autonomo per la Moda Nazionale (National Independent Authority for Fashion)
After the WWI and the ‘20s’ crisis, the fascist regime heavily invested on fashion as an economic driver. The Ente Autonomo per la Moda Nazionale (National Independent Authority for Fashion), then National Agency of Fashion, opened the first National Exhibit of Fashion in April 1933, an event that was repeated every spring and fall. 

Morning dress, Authorization certificate
Oct 1, 1937

Morning dress in sky blue wool with brown leather belt.

Celebration of Italian production

The Agency enhanced the fibers and fabrics produced in Italy: hemp and rayon derived from cellulose and were domestic products, and were preferred to jute and cotton, which were imported.

Morning outfit, Authorization certificate
Oct 3, 1938

Morning outfit in wool and nutria fur embellishments.

Morning dress, Authorization certificate
Oct 3, 1938

Morning dress in wool.

Italian excellence and beauty
It also promoted the creation of Italian models that had to be certified by a hallmark. 

The R.D.L. of 13 January 1936 in fact obliged the Italian tailors to submit photos of models with fabric samples attached to a committee established the same year, on June 26th, to get the brand.

Afternoon cloak, Authorization certificate
Aug 6, 1936

Afternoon cloak in black duvetine wool with silver fox fur trimmings.

Afternoon cloak, Authorization certificate
Oct 28, 1936

Elegant afternoon cloak in wool velour with black fox fur trimmings and clasp in black antelope.

Each tailor had to have at least 30% of its collection registered by the Ente Nazionale della Moda as national models.

Afternoon ensemble, Authorization certificate
Feb 3, 1938

Afternoon ensemble, black dress and bolero in yellow wool.

Afternoon skirt, Authorization certificate
Oct 3, 1938

Afternoon skirt and blouse in wool and velvet trimmings.

Afternoon dress, Authorization Certificate
Mar 3, 1939

Dress in printed blue crêpe silk with patterned white flowers.

Lunch dresses
According to the etiquette, "breakfast takes place between 1 p.m. and 1:15 p.m., even if it may vary from region to region. Lunch is the evening meal (between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m.). Dinner defines the meal from 9 p.m. on, after theater. 

Dinner Dress, Authorization Certificate
Aug 8, 1936

Dinner dress and jacket laminated black and gold.

Dinner dress, Authorization certificate
Aug 6, 1937

Dinner dress in black velvet with pleated flounces and buttons of rubies and gold.

Evening dresses

Evening dress, Authorization certificate
Sep 1, 1937

Evening dress in silk laminated silver and blue-green.

Evening dress, Authorization certificate
Aug 8, 1936

Evening dress in opaque indigo satin with embroidered braid belt trimmed with leather. Silver necklace with diamonds at the neckline.

Evening dress, Authorization certificate
Feb 3, 1938

Light yellow silk organza evening dress.

Evening dress, Authorization certificate
Mar 2, 1938

Evening dress in white silk with printed floral motif,sashin cyclamen violet silk.

Evening dress, Authorization certificate
Mar 3, 1938

Evening dress in sky blue silk.

Evening dress, Authorization certificate
Oct 3, 1938

Evening dress in black silk satin crêpe (charmeuse).

Credits: Story

Cura della mostra:
Maria Paola Ruffino, Curatore per le arti decorative, Palazzo Madama
Coordinamento: Carlotta Margarone, Responsabile Comunicazione, Fondazione Torino Musei
Inserimento: Valentina Lo Faro e Francesca Papasergi
Traduzioni: Alessandro Malusà
#fashionpam

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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