The Fabric Source: From Nature

Global Fashion Agenda

Reducing environmental impacts through organic and natural fabrics

The Fabric Source: From Nature
In commercial farming, a lot of chemicals and pesticides are used, that have harmful impacts on workers, the environment and later also to the wearer of a product. To lower these impacts, a rejection of this type of agriculture towards ecological farming is needed, especially in the cotton production.  An excellent alternative are natural fibres like hemp or linen, that are not only more resistant and need less pesticides, but also grow faster, absorb CO2 and need less water compared to cotton. 
Organic Wool
Organic wool is from sheep that have not been exposed to chemicals like pesticides and are kept in humane and good farm conditions. The raw material used is certified and guaranteed for, for each batch in accordance with strict legislative standards of its country of origin. Livestock must be fed only certified organic feed; synthetic pesticides, hormones, vaccinations, and genetic engineering are prohibited; and woolgrowers must use practices that encourage livestock health.
Organic Cotton
If cotton is to be sold as organic, it requires a third party certification from independent, accredited certification agencies. Organic agriculture may vary slightly from country to country but common to all is, the prohibition of pesticides, defoliants, fertilizers and genetically modified seeds. Organic cotton is generally grown as part of a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems, and people. 
Organic Linen
Linen fibres are found in the stalk of the flax plant. Flax grows quick, is gentle on the land and easy to incorporate into modern crop rotation cycles. Flax is a natural, annually renewable material and actually absorbs CO2 as it grows. Flax contributes to the preservation of non- renewable resources and helps to reduce CO2 emissions. Flax requires limited inputs of pesticides or fertilizers. On average, half the amount of pesticides per hectare is required for flax agriculture compared to cotton production. Furthermore, flax is non-toxic and non-irritating so it is safer to handle by workers and consumers.
Organic Silk
Silk worms living in organically cultivated Mulberry trees produce organic silk. The worms consume the mulberry leaves, converting them into body mass, which they then use to spin their cocoon. Organic silk often takes place on a small scale among developing communities, in for instance China and India. Farmers save money by avoiding the use of chemical pesticides and fertilisers, while protecting the environment and producing a fibre that is kinder to human skin.
Flax
Linen fibres are found in the stalk of the flax plant. Flax grows quick, is gentle on the land and easy to incorporate into modern crop rotation cycles. Flax is a natural, annually renewable material and actually absorbs CO2 as it grows. Flax contributes to the preservation of non- renewable resources and helps to reduce CO2 emissions. Flax requires limited inputs of pesticides or fertilizers. On average, half the amount of pesticides per hectare is required for flax agriculture compared to cotton production. Furthermore, flax is non-toxic and non-irritating so it is safer to handle by workers and consumers.
Hemp
Industrial hemp, or cannabis sativa L., is one of the strongest and oldest natural fibres. Hemp has great adaptability to various climatic conditions and can easily grow to a height of 4 m. 1 acre of hemp produces fibres equalling 2-3 acres of cotton. Hemp can be a good fibre alternative to e.g. cotton, and hemp has a lower environmental impact than polyester or cotton.
Lenzing Modal®
Lenzing Modal® is made from beech wood. Beech wood forests are a natural and sustainable source of raw material that requires no artificial irrigation or planting. The fibre is produced, using Edelweiss technology. Edelweiss stands for a "symbiotic" production process – pulp. In this way, Lenzing Modal® is produced in an environmentally responsible way from the pulp through to the fibre. Up to 95% of the Lenzing Modal® production materials are recovered at Lenzing as a result of innovative environmental processes.
Tencel®
TENCEL® is the registered brand name for lyocell fibres with properties similar to traditional viscose. The fibre is made from cellulose from eucalyptus wood and FSC-certified leftovers from the timber industry. Eucalyptus trees grow very rapidly on marginal lands without artificial irrigation, gene manipulation, or synthetic pesticides. The trees are harvested from sustainably managed farms certified by FSC (Forest Stewardship Council). The fibre yield from eucalyptus is about 10 times higher than that of cotton. Lycocell creates a lower impact on the environment and produces fewer carbon emissions than mainstream, conventionally produced fibres. Additionally, some 98% of the solvent used to dissolve the wood pulp is recovered and reused in a closed loop process.
Monocel®
The fibre used for Monocel® is produced through a method called lyocell with properties similar to traditional viscose. The process differs from the viscose process mainly in that an organic solvent replaces the chemicals used in the viscose process. Together with the water used in the production, the solvent is recycled and reused in a closed loop system, thus there are no residues of harmful chemicals, and water consumption is reduced significantly. Monocel® is made from FSC-certified bamboo.
Credits: Story

The Fabric Source
Lodos Kumas
Zhejiang
ITJV
Kassim Textiles Ltd.
Newlife
Seidentraum

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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