Oct 26, 2017

Light ≅ Matter (Light)

Oscar Niemeyer Museum

Oscar Niemeyer Museum

Photographic Record of the Exhibition Light = Matter, Museu Oscar Niemeyer, 2017, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
This exhibition represents the first segment of the Light ≅ Matter project. This project, which gathers a selection of works belonging to our museum, distances itself from the conventional way in which the collections are exhibited, the gathering of works by schools and artistic groups from chronological criteria. In contrast, Light ≅ Matter teaches us that there are infinite ways of approaching works of art, as well as any objects, or even the relevant events scattered throughout our lives. By: Agnaldo Farias
No title, Tomie Ohtake, 2004, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Arcângelo Ianelli, 1990, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Flags, Alfredo Volpi, 1970, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Landscape with Figurines, Hermann Schiefelbein, 1885/1933, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Favela, Domício Pedroso, 1987, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Burning Yerba Mate, Alfredo Andersen, 1860/1935, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Light brings works from artists that lived in very distinct times, produced works that were different from each other but nonetheless had light as common denominator. A fascination that goes back to the painting of Da Vinci; to our ancestor who, with a drawing in a cave wall, made visible a scene or an animal. By: Agnaldo Farias
Trees II, Bruno Lechowski, 1927, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Fenced courtyard, Bruno Lechowski, 1887/1941, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Trees, Bruno Lechowski, 1927, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
General Fields I, Bruno Lechowski, 1926, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
At the Park, Guido Viaro, 1897/1971, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Barigui, Theodoro De Bona, 1970, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

De Bona learned how to paint with Alfredo Andersen (1860-1935), in Curitiba and went to Italy soon afterwards, where he continued his studies at the Academy of Venice. Upon returning to Curitiba, he held an exhibition with pieces painted in Europe and caught the attention of people due to their touch of modernity.

Barigui, Theodoro De Bona, 1970, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

He did not escape what was in vogue, the painting of the landscapes of Paraná, but he also included thematic painting and innovated when painting historical-mythological scenes, such as "Race of the Centaur", "Foundation of Curitiba" and "Paradise Lost".

Self-portrait, Poty Lazzarotto, 1988, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Cícero Dias, 1907/2003, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Rita Fialek - Cruz Machado Series, Orlando Azevedo, 1949, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

The journeys undertaken by the photographer Orlando Azevedo in Brazil resulted in series that show the physical and human geography of a country that is still unknown to many. In the series "Expedition to the Heart of Paraná", the State where he lives is revealed by the camera lenses. Part of this series is the photograph "Cruz Machado Series - Rita Fialek", in which he shows a girl from the old colony of Cruz Machado in festive Polish costumes.

Beggar Kid, Martín Chambi, 1934, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Dark Matter Series - 20, Manoel Veiga, 2015, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Black Skin, Angel Boy, Maureen Bissiliat, 1931, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
The framing, the care with lighting and shadows and, above all, the narrative in the photographs of Maureen Bisilliat, an English woman living in Brazil since 1957, are due to the photographer's past experiences as a painter and, above all, as a photojournalist. In the 1960's, Maureen decided to give up painting and dedicate herself to photography, and her first photographic essay was the series "Black Skin", inspired by her painting studies in living model studios. This series includes the photograph of the boy with angel wings waiting to go to the carnival ball.
First Page, Siron Franco, 2006, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
True or not, Juliana Stein, 1970, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
The Sun and The Moon, Heliana Grudzien, 1992, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
w-636, Abraham Palatnik, 2014, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

Research on the movement gives structure to Abraham Palatinik's artistic work since he started producing, in the 1940's. In this long-term investigation of cinetism, Palatnik moves between bidimensional and tridimensional, with many studies in the filed of pictorics, as well as creating machines and design pieces. His trajectory synthesizes methodological rigor and aesthetic extravagance, fruits of his Mechanical engineering background and appreciation for artisanal work. His piece 'W-6336' is part of W Series, in which laser cut wooden slats painted in acrylic create delightfully varied visual rhythms.

Belly, Luiz Carlos Brugnera, 2007, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Wind of Ether, Cláudio Alvarez, 1994, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Wind of Ether, Cláudio Alvarez, 1994, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Light in Motion, Júlio Le Parc, 1962, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
The exhibition begins, or ends, with two luminous works – an abstract painting by Tomie Ohtake and a photographic landscape by Vik Muniz. In its center pulsates the work of Julio Le Parc, an ambient where lights and shadows blend, where the revelation joins mystery. Among these three pieces, dozens of others appear in black and white walls. By: Agnaldo Farias
Jean Paul Sartre at Nida, Lithuania., Antanas Sutkus, 1965, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Guanabara Bay, Alfredo Ceschiatti, 1965, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
The Star Eater, Gilvan Samico, 1999, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

The work of Gilvan Samico is marked by the influence of cordel literature, especially by the use of woodcut portraying religious, mythological, folkloric and northeastern culture themes, always emphasizing the symmetry and restricted use of colors. This production made him one of the greatest representatives of the Armorial Movement, which emerged in the Northeast in the 1970's.

The Star Eater, Gilvan Samico, 1999, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

In "The Star Eater" the artist presents two paintings: in the upper part, the serpent is about to devour a star while it is attacked by a group of eagles...

The Star Eater, Gilvan Samico, 1999, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

...in the lower one, flanked by the two trees of Eden, again the serpent is interrupted in its malicious intention.

Iaô, Bate Folha, Héctor Carybé, 1911/1997, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Serenade, Ado Magoli, 1960, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, David Artz, 1837/1890, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Duel, Regina Silveira, 2013, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
In the Mood of the Afternoon, Cícero Dias, 1929, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Woman's Head, Cândido Portinari, 1903/1962, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Being and Monotype, Mira Schendel, 1919/1988, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Being and Monotype, Mira Schendel, 1919/1988, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Cícero Dias, 1907/2003, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Niobe Xandó, 1960, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
No title, Beatriz Milhazes, 1960, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
The 10 Planets, Larissa Franco, 1968, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
The sign of similar, not equal, of Light = Matter, inspired by Einstein's famous equation (E=mc2), points out that these terms are not opposites. Despite the intangible nature of light and the more or less emphatic embodiment of matter, both are intertwined. After all, light is born to our eyes as an exhalation of things, a kind of aroma, while the matter that constitutes things shines in the darkness when it is awakened by it. By: Agnaldo Farias
No title, Osmar Chromiec, 1978, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Roble Flowers, Isolde Hotte, 1902/1994, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Gamecock, Miguel Bakun, 1909/1963, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Barra Sul Entrance, Alfredo Andersen, 1930, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Marine, José Pancetti, 1935, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Mother with Child, Oswaldo Guayasamín, 1919/1999, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Guayasamín's work draws attention, subtly, to the dramas of humanity, especially to those of the Latin American people, whose face is suffering and hands twisted by violence, poverty, dictatorships and not always explicit forms of control. What he saw in his travels in Latin America was a tempered and shy personality that he portrayed as a expressionist in his paintings. Within this same perspective, he created a series called "Tenderness" between late 1980's and late 1990's, composed of several paintings of mothers and children. "Mother with Child" is a tribute to the mother of the artist and to all the mothers of the world.
Ridge Landscape with Character, Alfredo Andersen, 1918, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Laforge Family's Residence, Alfredo Andersen, 1907/1912, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Coconut Plantation, Dorothea Wiedemann, 1930/1996, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Coconut Plantation, Dorothea Wiedemann, 1930/1996, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Coconut Plantation, Dorothea Wiedemann, 1930/1996, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Record Radio, Old Headquarters, Juan Esteves, 2010, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum

Juan Esteves' experience as a photojournalist in several newspapers and magazines was his school. The photograph "Record Radio, Old Headquarters" (2010), is part of a series that aims to record the architecture in the historical center of São Paulo. Photographs that although current often resemble old ones due to the photographer's treatment of them, removing contemporary urban interference such as post wires. Record Radio's former headquarters were in the Tereza Toledo Lara Palace, built in 1910 and located on Rua Quintino Bocaiuva, between Rua Direita and Rua José Bonifácio. The radio was based there in the 1940's and 1950's.

Guaratuba, Lange de Morretes, 1928, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Painting A, Mario Rubinski, 1933, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Painting #1, Mario Rubinski, 1933, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Painting #1, Mario Rubinski, 1933, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Painting B, Mario Rubinski, 1933, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Ox Cart, Paul Garfunkel, 1900/1981, From the collection of: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Visual Arts
Credits: Story

Light ≅ Matter

Curatorship: Agnaldo Farias
Promotion: Oscar Niemeyer Museum
Room: 6

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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