Collection of Japan Fashion and Lifestyle Foundation

Japan Fashion and Lifestyle Foundation

Japan Fashion and Lifestyle Foundation has collections of vintage garments, textile samples, and clothing books.

Introduction of holding garments collection
Collection garments is vintage clothing, shoes, Japanese traditional fabric
Introduction of Yves Saint Laurent Vintage
The Japan Fashion and Lifestyle Foundation collection consists of around 180 vintage Yves Saint Laurent garments. The collection focuses on items from the early 1970s to the late 1980s, featuring garments that dominated this a score of years of fashion history. This exhibition showcases items from this vintage collection mixed together with today’s “real clothes”—wearable, buyable apparel—through newly-created collection videos and a virtual fashion show. Also featured in the exhibition are 12 mannequins dressed in Yves Saint Laurent’s vintage designs.
Tuxedo Ensemble
The smoking (tuxedo) jacket is one of Yves Saint Laurent’s signature styles.  In 1966 Saint Laurent transformed the male tuxedo to create a suit specifically for women, expanding the range of evening wear available.This ensemble consists of the smoking (tuxedo) suit and a long, masculine coat.

Double-breasted Coat

A princess line has been incorporated into this masculine looking coat to create a slim silhouette.

Tuxedo Jacket

The smoking (tuxedo) jacket is one of Yves Saint Laurent’s signature styles. In 1966 Saint Laurent transformed the male tuxedo to create a suit specifically for women, expanding the range of evening wear available.

Tuxedo Pants

Smoking (tuxedo) trousers with a satin stripe running along each leg from the high waist down to the hem.

The Safari Jacket
The Safari jacket is one of Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic looks, and is inspired by the sportswear worn by the elegant aristocracy. Saint Laurent transformed the highly functional safari jacket into a fashion statement. This ensemble consists of trousers and shirt jacket in the same fabric, with a wide belt to define the waist, representing a look that’s sporty yet feminine.

Safari Shirt Jacket

Presented as part of a suit, with the jacket and trousers in matching fabric. The Safari jacket is one of Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic looks, and is inspired by the sportswear worn by the elegant aristocracy. Saint Laurent transformed the highly functional safari jacket into a fashion statement.

Tuck Pants

These tuck pants are in the same fabric as the shirt jacket. During the late 60s, Yves Saint Laurent actively designed trousers for women. Elegant pants style became a classic item of women's wardrobe.

Safari Shirt Jacket
Presented as part of a suit, with the jacket and trousers in matching fabric. The Safari jacket is one of Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic looks, and is inspired by the sportswear worn by the elegant aristocracy. Saint Laurent transformed the highly functional safari jacket into a fashion statement.

Safari Jacket

The Safari jacket is one of Yves Saint Laurent’s iconic looks, and is inspired by the sportswear worn by the elegant aristocracy. Saint Laurent transformed the highly functional safari jacket into a fashion statement.

Wide Leg Pants

Elegant and feminine wide leg pants in velveteen. During the late 60s, Yves Saint Laurent actively designed trousers for women.

Pants Suite
During the late 60s, Yves Saint Laurent actively designed trousers for women. He transformed trousers, initially worn by men, into a feminine look conveying elegance and class.

Shirt Collar Jacket

Presented as a two-piece ensemble comprising jacket and pants. Elegant pants style enriches women's classic wardrobe.

Tuck Pants

Presented as a two-piece set of jacket and pants. Yves Saint Laurent interpreted masculine trousers into a look that’s both elegant and feminine.

Daytime Ensemble
Saint Laurent’s trousers are masculine and yet are designed with chic and elegant women in mind. These trousers are worn with a masculine double-breasted blazer, the bow blouse adding a feminine touch.

Blazer

A double-breasted blazer that features masculine tailoring and a feminine and elegant silhouette.

Tuck Pants

During the late 60s, Yves Saint Laurent actively designed trousers for women.
His elegant trousers became widely accepted by women as everyday wear, and enriched their wardrobes.

Bow Blouse

A pleated silk jacquard bow blouse.

Daytime Ensemble
An ensemble combining a Nep tweed suit and velvet skipper. The addition of velvet has added a modern twist to a classic style.

Nep Tweed Jacket

An ensemble of jacket and skirt in the same fabric, the jacket featuring knitted braid trimming on the collar and hem.

Nep Tweed Skirt

An ensemble of jacket and skirt in the same fabric, the skirt featuring buttons on the front.

Velvet Skipper Shirt

Daytime Ensemble
An ensemble consisting of a classical blouse and skirt, with the belt on the wide yoke waist creating the visual effect of a corset.

A puff sleeve blouse with a feminine sense of volume

A tiered skirt in shiny silk chambray, which produces a lissom and lively silhouette. This skirt was worn by Isabelle Adjani who starred in the movie “ Subway ” in 1985.

A folklore-inspired belt with red leather piping on black linen.

Daytime Dress
A double-breasted daytime dress featuring masculine tailoring and a feminine, straight shift silhouette.
Long Evening Dress
A straight dress, featuring bold slits under both arms and on the sleeves.

Long Evening Dress


Different fabrics have been combined in this dress, the feature of which is the beautiful draping of the skirt.

Long Evening Dress

An evening dress featuring a bold backless design and a slit in the front.

Long Evening Ensemble
A straight silhouette ensemble consisting of a bolero and a long skirt, featuring red lining of the black bolero.

Bolero

A bolero with red lining of the black outer fabric.

Long Skirt

A maxi length skirt with a beautiful silhouette that follows the body line.

A camisole in black grosgrain.

Introduction of Kushiori-Obi
The Japan Fashion and Lifestyle Foundation collects obi (sashes) produced by the traditional kushi-ori comb-weaving technique.
Kushi-ori obi
Weaving techniques that result in textiles with undulating surfaces have been known since ancient times, but kushi-ori, weaving with a boxwood comb, is comparatively recent, considered to only date back to Japan’s Edo period, which began in the 17th century. Kushi-ori textiles are a type of plain weave kasuri textile made with just the warp dyed (tategasuri), although kasuri textile can be woven with either the warp or weft dyed, or with both dyed. The beautiful tategasuri textiles in the Shosoin repository in Nara long inspired Kyoto weavers, but the rare threads required are disappearing and no more artisans remain in Kyoto, so production of the textile has come to a halt. One by one, the precious weaves of the Nishijin district are dying out.
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