“Murals expressed reactions to the social, economic, and political condition of minorities. Because of their accessibility, murals became popular in underserved communities; they offer opportunities for youth to express themselves as an alternative to traditional art on canvas. They promote pride of cultural identity and they empower communities.From 1940-1980 numerous murals were created by African Americans in Los Angeles and they are reflected in this exhibition. Some of them no longer exist because they were destroyed or simply painted over. The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles, as part of its mission to preserve our history, will continue to research and document the rich history of artworks created by African Americans in Los Angeles from the 1940s to now." - Isabel Rojas-Williams, Executive Director, Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles

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All photographs copyright - The Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles (MCLA), Isabel Rojas-WIlliams and Robin Dunitz

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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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