In the development of women’s local costume in Greece during the 18th century one can discern survivals of garment forms from a period for which we have very little relevant information. These forms were the basis of what was to follow in the mid-19th century when, with the Romantic Movement, local costume came to assume a fixed appearance in Greece, Western Europe and elsewhere.

The starting point
Two types of garment form the starting point: a three-metre-long dress from Kassos and Karpathos with a fold recall the "kolpos" of the Ionic chiton and a loose, pleated dress from Crete.

Short dress. Mesta, Greece. Early 20th century

Phelonion. Crete, Greece. Late 18th century

Phelonion. Crete, Greece. Late 18th century

The chemise
A chemise is the basic garment in every Greek woman's costume and morphologically is a continuation of the dalmatic. It was worn as an undergarment and was cut in such a way as to fascilitate the wearing of outer garments of similar cut.

Chemise. Trikeri, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Trikeri, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Thessaly, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Attica, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Stymfalia, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Stymfalia, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Stymfalia, Greece. Early 20th century

Chemise. Episkopi, Greece. Early 20th century

The dress
The Greek women's costumes often include a sleeved or sleeveless dress. Its length varies and it takes the name of the material from which it is made.

Local costume of Skopelos, Greece. Early 20th century

Bridal costume of Kymi, Greece. 18th century

Bridal costume of Trikeri, Greece. Early 20th century

Bridal costume of Skyros, Greece. Early 20th century

Local costume of Astypalaia, Greece. 1870

Local costume of Psara, Greece. Early 20th century

Local costume of Spetses, Greece. Early 20th century

Outer garments
The Greek woman's costumes include another type of garment, a coatdress known as "anderi", "kavadi", kaftan, "doulamas" and "sayas". The main outer garment, a sleeveless or sleeved overcoat, is the "pirpiri" and the "dzoumbes".

Bridal costume of Kastelorizo, Greece. Late 19th century

Bridal costume of Elymbos, Greece. Early 20th century

Bridal costume of Alexandreia, Greece. Early 20th century

Bridal costume of Soufli, Greece. Early 20th century

Bridal costume of Stefanoviki, Greece. Early 20th century

Bridal coat dress from Pylaia, Greece. Late 19th century

Bridal coat dress from Asvestohori, Greece. Late 19th century

Local costumes from Sifnos, Greece. Late 18th century

Urban costume of Pyrgos, Greece. Late 19th century

Urban costume of Ioannina, Greece. Mid-19th century

Urban costume of Ioannina, Greece. Mid-19th century

Wedding ensemble of Aspasia King. Athens, Greece 1830

Coat dress. Turkey. Late 19th century

Coat dress. Syria. Late 19th century

Coat dress. Turkey. Late 19th century

Jacket. Peloponnese, Greece. Mid-19th century

The Greek court dresses
Two examples of court dress, the costume introduced by Queen Amalia in 1837 and that subsequently created by Queen Olga in 1867, influenced both urban and rural costumes in Greece.

‘Amalia’ costume. Athens, Greece. Late 19th century

‘Amalia’ costume. Cyprus. Early 20th century

Costume worn by the ladies-in-waiting of Queen Olga. Athens, Greece. Mid-19th century

Festive costume from Kifissia, Greece. Early 20th century

Local costume of Corfu, Greece. Early 20th century

Credits: Story

Text: Ioanna Papantoniou, Maria Papadopoulou, Angeliki Roumelioti
Photographer: Costas Vergas

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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