Artists by Nation - Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2014

Michael Van Dam, QLD
Michael Van Dam is sheet metal worker by trade. In 2013 Van Dam participated in in his first major exhibition, the Swell Sculpture Festival, at which he was awarded the Emerging Artist Award and the Artist Peer Award. His small work in the same festival won the Smalls People’s Choice Award. He has since participated at Sculpture at Sawmillers and Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2014, and his works have been acquired into various private collections throughout Australia. Van Dam’s sculptures are made from 4mm marine grade stainless steel chain. He works by welding the chain links together, which results in strong, durable and distinctive works. 
Nick Maxwell, TAS
Nick Maxwell is a Tasmanian artist and designer based in Hobart. He completed his Bachelor of Fine Art majoring in sculpture at the University of Tasmania in 2002. He has exhibited in numerous exhibitions around Tasmania and Victoria. Maxwell’s work relies heavily on reclaiming, salvaging and transforming materials and is predominantly directed by the materials at hand mostly Tasmanian hard wood and minor species. He seeks to reinvent the material and is fascinated with the history and stories the materials and objects offer. His work utilizes figurative and iconic symbolism as a means to convey a narrative. His larger works tend to be bold and symbolic in nature. Maxwell is also a practicing furniture designer and maker with a similar ethos of reuse and reclaiming to create stylish sustainable design. “To leave the shore, to venture aboard and take a chance, cast adrift amongst the currents holding your head above the waterline”. Nick Maxwell
Will Maguire, NSW
William Maguire is one of very few contemporary blacksmiths in Australia. He works with hot steel, forging and manipulating it, striving to create forms that are beautiful, genuine and new. He uses rare skills learnt during a four year apprenticeship, and over the years as a free spirited journeyman. He has worked with some of the best blacksmiths in Europe, Asia and America. In Australia overlooking the beautiful Hunter Valley farmland, he designs and forges the best of contemporary blacksmithing, creating iron with personality. Maquire was recently awarded a major stipend at Sculpture on the Greens, and in 2013 he exhibited at the Gosford Regional Gallery. His works have been collected by the University of Newcastle, Transfield Holdings and private collections throughout Australia and overseas. Maguire has exhibited in three solo shows and numerous group exhibitions and been awarded a large public art commission in Newcastle’s ex-BHP site, for completion in 2015.
Ayako Saito, NSW
Ayako Saito came to Australia in 2002 from Tokyo and studied sculpture at the Australian National University from 2003, finishing a Masters Degree in 2008. Saito’s recent works are organic forms, inspired by the sensuality of the figure and are informed by the traditions of figurative sculpture. She mostly creates these works in plaster and then casts them in bronze. The steel geometric sculptures in this exhibition are something of a departure from the organic forms she has worked with before. Her bronze sculptures displace space, whereas the steel ones embrace and shape space using geometry to bring out the clarity and movement of the space. This geometry is what underlies nature.
Janaki Lele, NSW
Janaki Lele is an Indian born, Sydney based emerging artist. The infinite intriguing possibilities of paper are at the heart of her art practice. An architect by training, Lele traded in her architectural career for an adventurous one in paper art. An obsessive recycler, paper was an obvious medium of choice for her creations. She loves to experiment with various techniques in paper crafting and creation, and thus, her work is quite versatile. Her explorations in the world of paper so far have seen her create delicate cutworks, intricately textured and layered artworks and sculptures. Lele's work is usually a celebration of the world that we live in everyday, one that includes nature, creatures, colours and architecture. She strives to create art that will tread as lightly as possible on the environment. Perceptions of her Indian roots, Australian surroundings and architectural background have a huge influence on her art. She hopes that her art is able to strike a cord with people and generate curiosity, amusement and communication.
Pierre Cavalan, NSW
Pierre Cavalan arrived in Australia from Paris, France in 1974 and worked in the Sydney jewellery industry for many years. He set up a studio in Glebe, exhibiting his creations using recycled materials nationally and internationally. He broke new boundaries within the jewellry trade, mixing old and new materials in a baroque style that remains unique to his artistic style. Major galleries, museums and private collectors have purchased his work for their permanent collections, including the Australian National Gallery, the Museum of Art and Design in New York and the London Imperial War Museum. Cavalan's beautiful and structurally complex metal assemblages constitute a personal allegory for life, death and everything in between. He uses art to objectify his emotions and experiences. Through the masterful use collected and often domestic objects he explores the blurred borders between art and reality, evoking neo-Dadaist Robert Rauschenberg's idea that there is no reason not to consider the world one gigantic painting.
Ian Swift, NSW
Ian Swift was born in Inverell, NSW in 1952 and currently lives in the Blue Mountains in NSW. He completed a Bachelor of Art, majoring in sculpture, at the University of New England in 1989. The following year Swift participated in his first group exhibition at First Draft Gallery, which was followed by numerous group and solo exhibitions. He has been awarded numerous prizes for his artistic practice, including the Sculpture by the Sea Site Specific Prize in 2002 and Blue Mountains Sculpture Prize in 2001. Swift is renowned for his ability to create unique pieces using recycled materials and commonly discarded items such as industrial moulds, furniture parts, wood, plastics and very often the totally unexpected in his quest to produce distinctive one-off sculptural works that can often be simultaneously humorous and pointed in their commentary. 
Kimie Kitamura, NSW
Kimie Kitamura was born in Hokkaido, Japan and has lived in Australia since 1997, now living and working in Sydney. Growing up in Japan, ceramics were part of everyday life for Kitamura, and from an early age she enjoyed choosing the appropriate bowl or plate for the every meals her mother cooked. She especially liked the personality and creative soul of handmade objects, which were both beautiful and useful. Kitamura graduated with a Certificate II in Visual Arts and Contemporary Craft at NSW TAFE Hornsby campus in 2011 and Certificate IV (2010), Certificate III (2008) in Ceramics. She has received the Highest Achievement award at two ceramic courses. Kitamura has also apprenticed for the artist Jane Barrow, and she completed an assistantship at Guldagergaard, the International Ceramic Research Centre in Denmark. Kitamura has exhibited at Danmark’s Keramikmuseum in 2012. She has since been selected to show at various outdoor sculpture exhibitions in Australia.In her approach towards her work, regardless of whether they are useful or not, beautiful or quirky, Kitamura aims to make pieces that give people a sense of joy and happiness, and hopes her work will be part of the memory and everyday life of the passer-by.
Kerrie Argent, WA
Growing up in the Goldfields in the seventies, a career in art was not deemed to be a serious career option. Kerrie trained as a nurse, juggling working full time with as many visual art workshops as possible in Lake Grace. In 1997 the community of Lake Grace was offered an opportunity to take part in a pilot program with Curtin University to do an Art and Design course, which Argent eagerly undertook. She was then offered a position to continue her associate degree and ten years later Argent had her degree in Art and the ability to prioritize her practice. Her work has since been acquired in various national and international private collections. Argent creates art out of everyday disposable materials, experimenting with forms and enjoying the audience response to objects composed with items usually thrown away. Argent has had five solo exhibitions since graduating, as well as a number of group exhibitions including Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi, Cottesloe, and Aarhus. She was awarded the Western Australian Sculptor Scholarship alongside fellow artist Elaine Clocherty at Cottesloe in 2014.
Geoff Harvey, NSW
Geoff Harvey studied at the National Art School in Sydney in 1974. He has appeared in numerous group exhibitions in Australia, England and the USA, including Sculpture by the Sea from 1997 to 2012 and regularly at the Robin Gibson Gallery annual sculpture survey. Harvey received the Sculpture by the Sea People’s Choice Award in 1998 and was a member of the Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2000 curatorial panel alongside Jackie Menzies, the previous Head of Asian Art, AGNSW. Harvey's work is held in a large number of collections throughout Australia including the National Gallery of Australia, the Art Gallery of South Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, and the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery.
Carla Gottgens, VIC
Carla Gottgens studied at the College of Fine Art, graduating with a major in photography. Having exhibited around Australia over the past 15 years, Gottgen’s work to date spans the photographic, installation and sculptural genres. Of her photographic installation work at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2014, Gottgens say: "They are here to oversee and protect. Often unnoticed, hidden and shunned. Friend or foe? They are the guardians."
Richard Tipping, NSW
Richard Tipping was born in Adelaide and studied film, philosophy and literature at Flinders University. In 1975 he was co-founder of the Friendly Street Poetry Readings, editing the first anthology in 1977. He began composing typographic poems on a manual typewriter in 1967, exploring the page as a field of composition. In the 1970’s Tipping began collecting ironies and oddities in public signage through photography, and changing public signs to make poetic messages. He continues to explore the physical qualities of language and making art with words, getting poetry off the page and into the streets. As a poet he is represented in many anthologies and has published five books. Richard Tipping is best known as a sculptor and word-artist who has exhibited widely in Australia as well as in New York, London and German cities including Munich, Cologne and Berlin.
Elyssa Sykes-Smith, NSW
Elyssa Sykes-Smith has always been interested in the human figure as subject matter and continually returns to this theme. She is interested in exploring the physical, anatomical and technical challenges faced when working with the subject and believes in the communicative and expressive power that a simple pose or gesture of a figure can make. Sykes-Smith takes second hand wooden frames and off-cuts which are cut into random pieces and then she uses the pieces as they jump out at her. This technique has allowed her to explore the geometric and spatial aspects of the figure. Sykes-Smith has recently completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Hons) at the National Art School. She has been awarded several prizes including the Sculpture by the Sea Clitheroe Foundation Mentorship in 2012.
Fiona Meller, NSW
Fiona Meller trained first in sculpture then in jewellery and object design at the Central Institute of Technology, Perth. She returned to Sydney and continued Jewellery and Object Design Studies at the Design Centre Enmore in 2011. She is currently a resident at Square Peg Studios in Marrickville. Through experimentation she tries to understand the properties inherent to the materials and extend their function beyond the accepted norm. This often leads to serendipitous results, creating objects that are imbued with a visceral and evocative meaning. She has long held a fascination with bones and found objects, and now with her training in jewellery she tries to combine the metal elements with these collected pieces. For her, bone has strong symbolism held deep within the psyche. The wishbone, especially, has long been a symbol of hope and the possibility of a wish come true. Her work is “a continued exploration of the wishbone theme in my outdoor sculpture. They are my response to the plight of refugees and boat people everywhere in the world”. Fiona Meller
Peter Tilley, NSW
Born in Williamstown, Victoria in 1946, Peter Tilley now lives and works in New South Wales. Tilley received a Certificate of Art and Ceramics from the Newcastle School of Art and Design, NSW and was also privately trained as a sculptor. He was awarded his Master of Philosophy (Fine Art) from Newcastle University. Still-life has been the primary focus of Tilley's recent work and remains a current influence. Drawn to the spatial relationships of scale and context, Tilley continues to investigate the connection of objects and figures as they are precisely staged by the artist. His work investigates the human condition in our contemporary world. He uses animals as avenues for affection, patience and compassion that are not always available in human relationships. They also serve as a metaphor for human behaviour and personality. Tilley's exhibiting history is extensive, with over 70 group shows and 20 solo exhibitions to his name. He has exhibited in Sculpture by the Sea regularly since 2004, including Sculpture by the Sea, Aarhus, Denmark in 2009 and 2011.
Cave Urban, NSW
Cave Urban is a grass roots design collective dedicated to the study, design and practical application of sustainable systems for living through research into vernacular and indigenous architecture and organic, recycled and recyclable materials. Formed in 2010, Cave Urban an evolving group of creative professionals. Freelance journalist, Lachlan Brown has worked on several Cave Urban installations since 2010. Nici Long is practising architectural designer and founder of Cave Urban. Key areas of interest include sustainable house design, including the use of bamboo as a low-energy building material. Chilean architect and sculptor Juan Pablo Pinto has had a close involvement with large scale public sculpture encompassing a wide spectrum of materials (especially bamboo). Architect Jed Long has attended several bamboo workshops, seminars worldwide, partaking in projects in Thailand, Portugal, Japan and Sydney. Architect Alice Nivison’s focus is on the interface between architecture and art. She is a creator of several major public art installations in Sydney.
James Nguyen, NSW
James Nguyen is a Sydney based artist who explores the many contradictions of the body and the object via a range of material and conceptual devices. He completed his undergraduate studies at the National Art School and is currently exploring the cinematic potential of objects and performance art in his MFA at the Sydney College of the Arts. “These small works are material and process driven counterparts to the skywriting inscriptions. They act as models for and against the idea of absence and transience”. James Nguyen
Melissa McElhone, NSW
Melissa McElhone studied Ceramics at Sydney Ceramic Studio for three years and is currently completing her MFA at UNSW school of Art and Design. She was a prize winner at Hunters Hill Sculpture show in 2013 and is focused on expanding her sculpting practice using ceramics and various metals. “I really like the contrast of harsh and rigid steel to the fluidity and flexibility of clay. The challenge is in joining the two together” Melissa McElhone. For this years Sculpture by the Sea exhibition, McElhone was inspired by a favourite painting at the Art Gallery of NSW: Three studies from the Temeraire by Cy Twombly. In the painting, the vessels are suspended in the sky and sea without a horizon. For hundreds of years many cultures and people have made the journey to Australia and found home. The mounted vessels sailing into a big sky and water reflect this hopeful but uncertain journey. Originally from Perth, McElhone lives in Sydney with her husband and three sons. She made her big journey to Sydney at the age of 21 and has since traveled between states.
Braddon Snape, NSW
Born in Lake Macquarie, NSW, Braddon Snape began his University studies in Newcastle in 1993. His time at the University of Newcastle culminated in the attainment of a Master of Fine Art in 1999. During his studies Braddon was awarded the Joe Punshon Memorial Prize for Sculpture in 1993, the Macquarie Manufacturing Post Graduate Award for Sculpture in 1998 and was a finalist in the National Tertiary Art Prize, Hobart, 1994. Snape has become an established Australian sculptor creating large-scale works. Snape has also been selected in various National awards, including the McClelland Sculpture Survey and Award 2007 and the Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize 2009. His work has been widely collected in Australia, Great Britain, China, USA and Korea. In 2012 Snape was invited as one of five International artists to participate in a residency in Seoul, South Korea, to create a large-scale work for the International Sculpture Festa 2012. This is the seventh time he has exhibited at Sculpture by the Sea.
George Andric, SA
“These sculptures are part of an ongoing inquiry into the relationship between form, structure and perception” George Andric. Born in 1960 in Yorketown, George Andric holds a Bachelor of Visual Art from the University of South Australia. The artist uses sculpture to explore the patterns of nature and rhythms of our human existence. His practice is based on a constantly evolving principle and method of construction, addressing complex forms which arise from simple elements. His sculptures are created as an arrangement of basic units, allowing him to examine the dynamic relationship between the simple and the complex, between the material and the void, and between the viewer and the object. As an artist, Andric strives to find some sense of order independent of the world that presents itself to him, which at times can be deceptive and illusory.
Ron Robertson-Swann OAM, NSW
Ron Robertson-Swann is actively involved in the arts in Australia as a sculptor, teacher and advocate. Robertson-Swann studied sculpture with Lyndon Dadswell at the National Art School in Sydney, with Anthony Caro and Phillip King at the St Martin’s School of Art in London and was an Assistant to Henry Moore. He has exhibited extensively in both Australia and overseas, and his works are included in all major public Australian collections. He has educated as Head of the Sculpture Workshop at the Canberra School of Art and the National Art School in Sydney. In 2002 Robertson-Swann was awarded the Order of Australia Medal for service to the arts in Australia.
Lou Lambert, WA
Lou Lambert was born in Subiaco, Western Australia. During the early 1970s, he studied sculpture at Perth Technical College and Curtin University and then worked as assistant to British Sculptor Phillip King, London, UK. On return to Australia, he lectured in drawing and sculpture in the School of Fine Art, Curtin University. Since the early 1980's Lambert has made repeated journeys into the Australian landscape; the Pilbara, Kimberley and Central Australia. A fellowship awarded by the Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council in 1990 enabled further development and opportunity for interstate exhibitions. Lambert is represented in major Australian public collections. He has also been represented in Australian contemporary sculpture abroad, significantly in Japan, including Painters and Sculptures - Diversity in Contemporary Australian Art, Saitama, Japan 1987. This opportunity culminated in 1992 with a commission for Adachi City, Tokyo, Japan. Lambert first participated in Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi and Cottesloe, 2005, and has exhibited regularly since.
R.M. (Ron) Gomboc, WA
Ratimir Marijan (Ron) Gomboc was born in Slovenia in 1947 and attended school in Croatia before immigrating at the age of 13 with his family to Western Australia. Gomboc went on to study sculpture and printmaking at the Perth Technical College, as well as painting and drawing at Midland Tech. Gomboc's various awards include the Swan Citizen of the Year Award, 1991; the Western Australian Week Citizen of the Year Award for his contribution to Arts and Culture, 1993; and the Centenary Medal for outstanding commitment to the community in raising the awareness of art. In 2010 Gomboc became a member of the Sculpture by the Sea Decade Club for exhibiting ten times in Bondi and last year he became a member of the Sculpture by the Sea Decade Club in Perth for exhibiting ten times in Cottesloe. He has had numerous exhibitions overseas and represented Australia by invitation at the 2010 Melanesian Art Festival, New Caledonia, as Artist in Residence. In 2011 Gomboc was selected to represent Australia at the Tenth Anniversary of the Goyang Sculpture Symposium in South Korea. In 2012, he was selected to represent Australia at the Qingdao-Seoul Stone Sculpture Symposium in Qingdao China.
Michael Greve, VIC
Michael Greve was born and raised in Melbourne and studied at the RMIT sculpture department in the early days. Becoming more and more independent from the opinions of others in later life, he determined to view his works and creations his way. Greve’s latest discovery is ancient Blackgum, predicted to be over 3,000 years old. It was ebonised by the mud under river flats and hardened and darkened to a rich dark brown and red wood, taking on a life of its own. As he works on a piece, it changes shape, moving and almost bubbling as it “comes back to life”. This series has moved from seascapes to ‘earthscapes’. Australia is fortunate to have a magnificent environment, air, land, water and space. Greve loves his country, and his work shows us this love, as well as the respect he holds for what it gives to him. “I feel that the shape of the tree has been lost in the timber generic, where the utilitarian appeal of timber has been over emphasised at the expense of the expression of the tree. It seems that the wood is considered more important than the original living form”. Michael Greve
Morgan Shimeld, NSW
The work of Sydney based sculptor Morgan Shimeld, is primarily concerned with the abstraction, construction and manipulation of pure form. He works intuitively in a creative and meditative process striving to find a natural sense of balance, strength, and elegance in the complex arrangement of abstracted minimalist forms. Shimeld’s sculptures, constructed out of fabricated or cast bronze or steel, hold a powerful presence as well a subtle quality of understated beauty. Working from small to large scale, Shimeld’s sculptures translate well to any scale with universal characteristics. His aim is to a draw the viewer in, creating a relationship between the spectator and the space in between. Walking around Shimeld’s work will give the experience of unique disposition and sense of presence of each piece.
Christabel Wigley, VIC
Christabel wigley was born in Melbourne, Australia in 1963, and has been actively developing as a sculptor since 2004. Wigley’s development as an artist has evolved through a cross fertilisation in the areas of performing and visual arts. Working over a decade in film and theatre, Wigley began visual arts in New York in the mid 1980’s in parallel with performance work and traveling extensively within Australia, Europe, India and the Americas.Wigley’s early explorations were two dimensional and influenced by the work of her father James Wigley (1918-1999), who spent a large part of his life working and painting with the aboriginal peoples of north-western Australia.
Orest Keywan, NSW
Orest Keywan was born in Marienbad, on the Czech German border, in 1944. In 1965, Keywan arrived in Sydney and the following year entered the National Art School in Sydney, where he studied under Lyndon Dadswell. He currently lives and works in Sydney, Australia. Keywan, who is represented in public and private collections in both Australia and internationally, has been hailed by art critic Sebastian Smee as ‘one of the best sculptors we have’. Keywan has been exhibiting with Sculpture by the Sea every year since 1998 and is the only Australian to have won the major prize at Sculpture by the Sea twice. Keywan’s sculpture is set apart by a careful consideration of the interaction between viewer and sculpture, an elegant linearity and a unique engagement of space. What is often singled out in accounts of Keywan’s sculpture is his ability to suggest in a work a sense of space that extends far beyond the physical dimensions of each piece. Using whimsical linearity and a gentle irony, Keywan manages to engage the emptiness of his sculpture’s surrounding environment and conjures a sense of the ephemeral. As a result, Keywan’s body of work has been described as being at once part of this world yet also distinct from it.
Jock Clutterbuck, VIC
Jock Clutterbuck was born 1945 in Edenhope, Victoria. He is a sculptor and printmaker of national significance, known for his sophisticated abstract forms executed with precision and detail, while maintaining an impression of underlining esoteric mysticism. From the abstract movement in his finely patinated bronze sculpture to the precise script-like details in his limited edition prints, Clutterbuck masters his material. Clutterbuck studied sculpture and drawing at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology from 1965 to 1966, where he subsequently taught before taking up a role as the lecturer in sculpture at the Victorian College of the Arts from 1974 – 2000. He is represented in many national and international public art collections including the Museum of Modern Art New York, the NGA, the Art Gallery of NSW, the National Gallery of Victoria, and Queensland Art Gallery. Clutterbuck has held around 40 solo exhibitions of sculpture and printmaking over a 48 year career. He represented Australia in 14 international print biennales as well as numerous group shows around the world.
Sam Deal, VIC
The materials Deal uses in his works are reliant on the essence and attitude instilled in individual and collected objects. Individually the objects remain inanimate shapes and forms, inert and without rationale. Yet when crafted and embodied into co-existing relationships, these objects burst forward as amalgamated entities speaking of their nature, edifying an intrinsic mechanic beauty. Sam was born in 1978 growing up near Vaughan, a small town in Central Victoria. He was raised on a 60 acre farm in a remote valley surrounded by National Park forests and without electricity or town water. He deliberately chose an alternative approach into sculpture studying sciences and engineering at Latrobe and RMIT Universities. Deal continues to work from the farm and over time has established an off-grid solar-powered workshop full of his rare objects, scientific equipment and recycled industrial elements. “I rarely commence with a finished concept in mind. I much prefer being open to the creative process and the manner in which the objects naturally dictate how the piece evolves”. Sam Deal
Lucy Barker, NSW
Lucy Barker has exhibited with Sculpture by the Sea regularly since 2009. She has a varied creative background, having studied traditional oil painting in Italy, completed a Bachelors of Visual Communications at UTS, and worked both as an Art Director and a Copywriter. Barker returned to her artistic practice after the birth of her first child in 2005. She has since been represented at Sherman Art Galleries, Woollahra, and in 2003 won the Small Sculpture Prize and Willoughby Art Prize, amongst others accolades. Barker’s work is characterised by its accessibility and a quirky vernacular that expresses the ironies of life.  
Stephen King, NSW
Stephen King graduated from Sydney College of the Arts in 1979, where he gained a Diploma of Visual Arts with a printmaking major. In 1981 he travelled to London to study at St. Martins School of Art. King then returned to Walcha, NSW to live and work on his family’s sheep and cattle property. He continued his printmaking and gradually moved into making figurative sculpture using fallen timber. King’s subjects have ranged from generational change and continuity to the role of big business and religious ideals. He has also explored the business of farming and how man and nature struggle to find the right balance. King has exhibited extensively internationally and within Australia.
Michael Le Grand, ACT
Michael Le Grand has been working in steel since graduating from the Victorian College of the Arts in 1974. Over his acclaimed career spanning nearly 40 years, Le Grand has been awarded many grants, fellowships and prizes. After further studies at St. Martin’s School of Art in London he was awarded an Australian National University Creative Arts Fellowship in 1978. He was a recipient of an Australia Council Travel Grant in 1975; the Capital Arts Patron’s Fellowship and the ACT ARTS Creative Arts Fellowships in 1997. He was the Co-Recipient of the Inaugural Sydney Water Sculpture Prize, Sculpture by the Sea Bondi 1997 and awarded the inaugural University of Western Sydney Acquisitive Sculpture Prize 2004. In 2010 Le grand was awarded a prestigious Helen Lempriere Scholarship. In 2007 he retired as the Head of Sculpture at the Australian National University School of Art, where he is now an Emeritus Fellow. In 2011, Le Grand had a significant retrospective exhibition at the Canberra Museum and Gallery. In 2012 he was invited to participate in the McClelland Sculpture Survey and Award. Le Grand is a member of the Sculpture by the Sea Decade Club having exhibited regularly in Sculpture by the Sea Bondi since 1997. He has exhibited regularly at Sculpture by the Sea Cottesloe and Aarhus.
Brett Ashby, VIC
Brett Ashby studied Contemporary Media Practice at the University of Westminster, London, UK. Prior to his studies overseas, Ashby explored animation and art theory as an extension of his life-long love of art, both traditional and contemporary, through a BA in Animation and Interactive New Media at RMIT, Melbourne. As a young boy, Ashby explored the art of sketching and drawing houses alongside his builder father. He developed his skills, exploring painting and line art on objects such as doors, walls, musical instruments and framed works, then moving on to commissions to paint even larger surfaces such as cars, bridges, walls and furniture. Ashby grew up playing soccer, which developed into a semi-professional career which he would only give up for his art practice. Today he integrates the ideas of human physical movement through his love of travel, adventure, sports and culture within his artistic philosophy for both sculptural and 2D works. Ashby’s artistic exploration of places and spaces focuses on documenting and gathering the natural and potential energy within his reality.
Frank Veldze & Suzanne Donisthorpe, VIC
Frank Veldze and Suzanne Donisthorpe have been collaborating together in artistic practice for eight years. They specialise in large scale, immersive sculptures and installations that encourage audience engagement. They are interested in notions of home and place. Frank’s day job is as a fabricator of large bronze sculptures at the Fundere Fine Art Foundry in West Footscray. Suzanne is also a producer and reporter at Books and Arts Daily at Radio National and is a published novelist. They have shown at Heide Gallery and at the Lorne, Buller, Yering and Montalto Sculpture shows.
Ken Unsworth AM, NSW
Ken Unsworth was born in Melbourne, Australia in 1931 and currently lives and works in Sydney. He attended school both in Melbourne and Sydney, studying at the University of Melbourne, Melbourne Teacher’s College and the National Art School of Sydney. Unsworth has held several teaching positions including Lecturer in Art at Bathurst Teacher’s College; Lecturer and Head of Art Teacher Education at the Tasmanian School of Art; and Lecturer in Sculpture at Sydney College of Advanced Education. Unsworth has held numerous solo exhibitions in Australia and overseas, including a major survey exhibition at the Art Galley of New South Wales in 1998. He has participated in major international exhibitions including the Paris Biennale, 1985; Magiciens de la Terre, Paris, 1989; and the Biennale of Istanbul, Turkey, 1995. 
Paul Selwood, NSW
Paul Selwood began making sculpture in 1964 after he enrolled at East Sydney Technical College. He was Technical Assistant at the Royal College of Art, England from 1965/68 and worked for Sir Anthony Caro. He was invited to teach sculpture at Bath Academy of Art 1968-70.Optical Art, Pop Art, Minimalism and Abstraction were the aesthetic propositions at the time and Selwood met many of the leading British and American painters and sculptors in these formative years. Since returning to Australia in 1971, Selwood has had over 26 solo exhibitions and has been included in numerous group exhibitions. He was lecturer in charge of sculpture at USQ 1977-82 and lecturer in sculpture at Newcastle University 1986-96. He is included in many public collections including the Art Gallery of NSW. He has exhibited in Sculpture by the Sea Bondi numerous times since 1999; Cottesloe 2011 and Aarhus 2013. He was the recipient of the Balnaves Foundation Sculpture Prize Sculpture by the Sea Bondi 2011.
Michael Purdy, NSW
Michael Purdy was born in 1964 and studied landscape architecture at UNSW Sydney. He grew up on Sydney Harbour and his relationship to the sandstone and, as a keen surfer, to the sea have resulted in works that speak about the many possibilities of this beautiful material. Colour, surface, pattern, form and texture all play a part in Michael’s tactile sculptures, from large outdoor installations and corporate interiors to domestic scale interiors and smaller one-off pieces.Years of experimentation have allowed Purdy to make sandstone appear to do things it isn’t meant to do. Exploration of the resulting possibilities has led to four major awards at Bondi Sculpture by the Sea, the 2014 Urban Growth Acquisitive Prize at University of Western Sydney Sculpture Award and Exhibition, and many high profile commercial commissions.
James Rogers, NSW
Originally from Sydney, James Rogers studied at the then Darling Downs Institute of Advanced Education from 1977-79, majoring in sculpture. Rogers has been exhibiting sculpture and painting in Sydney since 1980. He has held 17 solo exhibitions and has also been included in many group exhibitions including the Wynne Prize, the Blake Prize and now Sculpture by the Sea (for the 13th time since he was first included in 1997). He held a casual position as a teacher of sculpture at the National Art School for over 20 years. Rogers is represented in a number of public, private and institutional collections, among them NSW, UTS, Macquarie and Western Sydney Universities along with Bathurst, Maitland, Campbelltown and Tamworth Regional Galleries. He has also realized a number of public commissions in various locations including the University of Western Sydney, Star City, the New Childrens Hospital Westmead and the Tamworth Regional Gallery. In 2011 he received a Helen Lempriere Scholarship and the Waverley Councils Mayors Award. He has been accepted into Sculpture by the Sea, Aarhus 2015.
Akira Kamada, NSW
Akira Kamada is a sculptor and installation artist whose central concern is the impact of human behaviour on the environment, combined with an artistic respect and reverence for the beauty of natural materials. Born in Japan in 1955, Kamada studied photography and painting before immigrating to Australia in 1987. While working as a landscape gardener, specialising in contemporary Japanese garden design, he studied ceramics and sculpture and began exhibiting in group shows and public exhibitions from the early 2000s. Kamada first entered Sculpture by the Sea Bondi in 2006, receiving the Clitheroe Foundation Emerging Artists’ Mentor Program Scholarship in 2008. He has exhibited regularly in most major sculpture shows throughout Sydney since then. Having moved to Jervis Bay (NSW) area in early 2014, Kamada looks forward to combining his artistic practice with a more sustainable lifestyle.
Margarita Sampson, NSW
Margarita Sampson received a Master of Art and Bachelor of Art from the University of New South Wales. Originally training as a painter, her first large textile sculptures began in 1997 as a response to a call-out for the inaugural Sculpture by the Sea. Her recent ‘Salon' series addresses instability, environmental collapse, growth and decay using the trope of coral reef formations applied to collapsing domestic furniture. Pieces from this series have won the 'Objects' section of the Waterhouse Prize 2012 and been included as finalists in the Wynne Prize 2013 & the Gold Coast Art Prize 2012. Sampson's work is typified by meticulously hand-sewn textiles, each piece taking several months to complete. In 2013 ‘The Great Bondi Share-house’ work was created as a site-specific piece for Sculpture by the Sea, invoking the complex hierarchies & compromises of the urban 'share-house', similar to the competing interests found in ecosystems.
Stephen Marr, NSW
Stephen Marr obtained a scholarship to attend the National Art School in Newcastle, and then travelled extensively throughout Asia. He was astounded by the ‘living art’ he encountered there, from the painting and carving that decorated houses and boats and the most everyday objects. He returned to Australia inspired to build a simple, alternative energy house in the bush with his bare hands and a chainsaw. Setting up a kiln and crude pottery, and teaching ceramics at the Technical College in Grafton, he soon made the move to the big smoke. Since then, Marr has built upon this narrative, exploring all forms of mediums and techniques. Recently this has been expressed through combining painting and sculpture. “Lately I have been carving figures of increasing simplicity; the pieces have a humorous primitive feel, very tactile and sensuous”. Stephen Marr
Jonathan Leahey, VIC
Over the past 20 years Jonathon Leahey has worked exclusively as a sculptor and has created numerous public art works in the United States, Ireland, Belgium and Australia. His public commissions have ranged from monumental stand alone steel works created entirely from objects found on site to kinetic, animatronic installations. Leahey has collaborated with various people and in many different situations to achieve the safe and appropriate installation of public art from city gardens or restaurants (for example, with structural engineers and planning officials from the Los Angeles City Council), to arranging logistics for a film shoot in the Sahara Desert (with the head of a Berber tribe in Morocco), or to create a fire breathing centrepiece for an international arts festival (with electrical engineers in Ireland). In his public commissions Leahey responds to the site, its history and its current use. His work creates a local identity resulting in an immediately recognisable, iconic image, accessible to the casual observer and inviting deeper consideration on a more complex conceptual level over time.
Jane Gillings, NSW
Self-taught, Gillings has been exhibiting for over 20 years. Much of her art is a consequence of asking questions and experimenting, making and imagining, pulling things apart and putting them back together, both visually and literally. From detailed realism to large-scale sculptural installations, the artist investigates the presentation of consumption and loss. By recycling materials ordinarily thrown away, Gillings resurrects them to amplify our assumption that they are endless. Discarded plastic cutlery, for instance, becomes a contemporary midden (Sculpture by the Sea 2012), discarded plastic cups and containers catch dripping water from a cliff face and mimic melting icicles (Sculpture by the Sea 2010). Through sculpture, printmaking and painting, Gillings attempts to send a subtle message, often with humour and word play, about how we conduct ourselves on this planet.
Harrie Fasher, NSW
Harrie Fasher graduated with Honours from the National Art School, Sydney in 2010. During her studies she was awarded the Julian Beaumont Sculpture Prize and the Bird Holcomb Foundation Scholarship. Subsequently, her dynamic practice utilising sculpture and drawing, has been recognised with major awards and grants such as the Jindabyne Lake Light Sculpture Prize, the Sculpture in the Vineyards Peoples Choice Award and NAVA’s Sainsbury Sculpture Grant. Fasher has participated in national and international residencies, including the Baer Art Centre Residency in Iceland and the Bathurst Regional Art Gallery’s Hill End Residency. In 2013 she traveled to the UK to exhibit with Arts Out West and to undertake an artist in residency at the Butley Mills Bronze Foundry. This year Fasher has designed and produced all the horse and human forms for Spirited: the Horse in Australia exhibition currently on show at the National Museum of Australia, Canberra. “A larger than life double-headed rocking horse is an entertaining look at the way we engage with life in contemporary society”. Harrie Fasher
Robert Barnstone, NSW
Robert Barnstone received a Masters of Architecture from the Graduate School of Design, Harvard University in 1991. He is a practicing architect engaged in the exploration of the boundaries between sculpture and building. In both architecture and sculpture Barnstone experiments with new applications to envelope design, framing techniques and material uses. His sculptural works investigate architectural space and structure. Some of Barnstone’s installations include Prone at the Socrates Sculpture Park in New York City, the Narrative Forest, CapArts in Providence, Rhode Island and Once Removed, Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi and Cottesloe. Stretch “came from a series of drawings of forms and led to an exploration of layered steel to capture the aspect of void in the piece”. Robert Barnstone
Julie Donnelly, NSW
Julie Donnelly is an abstract artist working in oil for painting, pencil for drawing, glass for sculpture and recycled plastics and timber for her assemblages. Her new body of work involves the use of cut glass vases, bowls, platters and other objects that are made of crystal or glass. Donnelly collects these crystal and glass pieces from op shops. They were once treasured possessions of bygone generations, now have been discarded by later generations as they are deemed to have little value. She reincarnates these objects into sculptures, having a rich visual heritage spanning time and space. The works are “individual eccentric, distinctive sculptures. These vases and bowls are reincarnated into timeless, eternal shapes that appeal to all generations”. Julie Donnelly
Thomas Quayle, NSW
Thomas Quayle has spent the past five years honing his creative abilities through various forms of study which culminated in him graduating from the National Art School with a Bachelor of Fine Arts (Honours). His recent achievements and development have provided him the opportunity to work in a studio in South West Sydney. Quayle’s works are predominantly in the ceramic medium, creating sculptures of various dimensions, however he also draws and paints in oils. Quayle’s work probes the nature of human experience and emotion, touching on subjects such as violence, desire, loneliness, and ostracism. His work is influenced by life events such as coming out as homosexual and the powerless feeling of viewing a violent act and being incapable of action.
James McCallum, NSW
James McCallum was born in Sydney Australia in 1989. In 2011 he finished a Fine Arts Honours degree at the National Art School in sculpture and was awarded the Clitheroe foundation mentorship program for Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi. In 2012 he won the Cessnock Regional Art Prize. McCallum has been inspired by jazz, with artists such as Theloneious Monk and Jimmy Smith influencing him to improvise in unique ways. He plays the trumpet, euphonium and trombone.
NEON, VIC
Founded in 2012 by Mark Nixon and George King, NEON is an award winning design practice that seeks to explore new territories between architecture, design and art. They do not buy into a particular design style or philosophy. They work without preconceptions to analyse each project independently in order to ascertain its unique opportunities and challenges and create a design that is often surprising, but always relevant. George King is a chartered architect who has worked extensively in the UK and internationally. He is experienced in designing projects in a wide range of type, size and scale and was part of the design team responsible for the London 2012 Olympic Aquatic Centre. He received his bachelor degree from the University of Liverpool and his Masters from UCL’s Bartlett School of Architecture. Mark Nixon is a chartered architect who studied for his bachelor degree at the University of Bath and the TUM in Munich and his Masters at UCL’s Bartlett School of Architecture in London. Nixon’s wide-ranging professional experience includes working for various design focused practices in London and Italy on projects at all stages, from concept through to completion. He is interested in a multidisciplinary approach to architecture.
Noah Birch, WA
Born in the USA, Noah Birch immigrated to Australia in 2002. Birch had trained as a carpenter in America, and was working as a construction foreman before moving to Australia. This cross-continental move brought about the desire for a change of pace for Birch, and he enrolled in an Industrial Design course at the Central Institute of Technology in Perth, achieving an Advanced Diploma in this field. Now a practicing self-taught artist, Birch has exhibited photography, furniture, and sculpture, with his first large outdoor sculptural work being exhibited Sculpture by the Sea in Cottesloe, 2009. Birch’s current practice combines a joy of the abstract object in his small works and an exploration of concept expressed in his large works.
Philip Spelman, NSW
As a practicing sculptor for the past 25 years, Philip Spelman works in both painted steel and unique cast and fabricated bronze. He is actively engaged in national and international exhibitions and commissions, and his sculptures are held in many important public, private and corporate collections, nationally and internationally. His works are abstract constructions where elements balance, tumble and float, creating positive and negative compositions of space, light and shade. The sculptures are memorable for their vibrant colours which give luminosity and depth, creating stunning silhouettes within their environment. Inspiration for his work is derived from many sources including urban industrial landscapes and architecture. “This work is an abstract composition of outcomes, creating elements that tumble and float. The sculpture uses vibrant colour to achieve luminosity and depth. Inspiration for this work is derived from urban industrial landscapes, architecture, and the utilitarian object”. Philip Spelman
Tamsin Salehian, NSW
Tamsin Salehian is an Australian artist who has been involved in both environmental and artistic projects in the UK and Australia for over 10 years. She has produced large-scale installations, exhibited internationally and her work often involves an interdisciplinary approach to media. Using computer modeling, sculpture, drawing and photography Salehian explores ideas concerning contemporary culture, and social and environmental issues. Her recent work has focused on issues within the suburban landscape, a revisited theme for more than ten years. Her work has returned to photographing suburbia, the suburbs offering a darker side, where the dreaming in the suburbs speaks plainly to the artist’s thoughts. “In exploring the way we live, I have been creating casts of small living spaces, playing with positive and negative space”. Tamsin Salehian. Salehian holds a BFA from the Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne University, and a BA/BSc (Human Ecology) from the Australian National University.
John Petrie, NSW
John Petrie is a Sydney based sculptor working primarily in stone. He has won several awards and is represented in collections at Tweed Regional Gallery, Thursday Plantation Sculpture Park and Macquarie University. He has works held in collections in France and the USA. In 2009 he won the competition for the Newcastle City Council Commission for the memorial sculpture for the ground of the Pasha Bulker. This work has now become almost an iconic feature of the Newcastle beach landscape. In 2011 he was artist in Residence at Australian Botanic Garden and in 2012 was only Australian participant in the International Stone Sculpture Project, Iksan, South Korea. In 2013 he was invited to participate in the seventh International Conference on Contemporary Cast Iron Art at Pedvale Open-Air Museum Latvia in 2014. For this he created a large work out of boulders and cast iron. The Australian landscape and in particular the boulder are the primary influences in his work. His works link the human figure and the landscape.
Stephen Harrison, ACT
Stephen Harrison has worked as a sculptor for almost 30 years, first graduating from the Canberra School of Art (Graphic Investigation Workshop), under the tutelage of Czech artist Petr Herel, in 1987. He has exhibited widely in Australia and overseas, including a six month stint in Paris, France, notching up 25 solo exhibitions and at least 40 group shows. Recently Harrison went back to the Canberra ANU and completed a Diploma of Art and a Masters of Visual Art in Sculpture, graduating with High Distinction, in 2012. His art practice has included drawing, painting, film, installation and sculpture. His work is based on emotive visual archetypes that we all recognize from childhood, or experience. Harrison is interested in the nature of consciousness and how this relates to sculpture. Harrison has travelled widely throughout Europe, America, Canada and Asia, as well as outback Australia. "The work draws on funereal sculpture, the nature of human consciousness and dream imagery”. Stephen Harrison
Koichi Ishino, NSW
Koichi Ishino was born in Japan, immigrated to Australia in 2009 and now lives and works in NSW. Ishino graduated from Kyoto City University with a Bachelor of Arts in 1976 and has been a full time artist for over 25 years. He has participated in Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi and Cottesloe regularly since 2001 and was awarded the Waverley Council Mayor’s Prize at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi in 2009. Ishino has gained an international reputation as an artist, having completed numerous significant public international commissions and has been the recipient of numerous prizes including the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art Award in 1997 and the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art Award in 1995. Ishino’s work is characterized by smooth mirror surfaces of stainless steel paired with stone. Throughout his career, Ishino has been developing original inlay techniques. In his work, materials of completely different qualities come together as one fabricated form.
Clara Hali, NSW
Clara Hali has been described as one of Australia's foremost female sculptors. Born in Indonesia, Hali studied arts at the University of Southern Queensland and the National Art School, Sydney. She has travelled extensively throughout Asia and Europe, studying the sculpture of many different cultural traditions. One of her tours included a six week residency at a tribal foundry in remote India. Hali has completed many commissions and has exhibited widely since 1980 in solo and group exhibitions. Her sculpture is represented in private and public collections including Macquarie University, University of Sydney, Cottesloe City Council, Perth, and Compaq Computers. She has been a lecturer in Sculpture at the National Art School for 22 years. She has exhibited regularly with Sculpture by the Sea since 2007. “I use the figure as my subject because my sculpture is about the universal self and about us as people on this planet. My work describes the human condition. My ideas are personal however many people have similar experiences. What I would like to communicate in my sculpture is my experience as a common experience, that people can identify with”. Clara Hali
Linda Matthews, NSW
In collaboration with Carterwilliamson Architects, Nuala Collins and Ben Peake. Linda Matthews is a founding member of Carterwilliamson Architects. Her background in graphic arts has led her to undertake a doctorate concerned with the development of architectural and urban design methodologies and she has developed a place based, site-specific method for generating building façade colour and form. She was recently awarded a travelling scholarship to attend the Venice Architecture Biennale. Nuala Collins has a rich and multidisciplinary design background. Collins’ main focus for the past ten years has been architecture, which has taken her from New Zealand to Switzerland, Denmark and Australia. To keep her practice diverse, alongside architecture Collins has worked in film, set, costume, exhibition and product design. Ben Peake joined Carterwilliamson Architects in 2013 after completing his bachelor of Design in Architecture at the University of Technology Sydney, where he was awarded Graduate of the Year by the Australian Institute of Architects.
Barclay Bailey, WA
Barclay Bailey is an aspiring and emerging artist who has not had any formal studies in art. He has embraced his creativity later than many artists and hopes that his creations in steel will be a continuing adventure. Of his work exhibited at Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi, Bailey says: 'Each sculpture is a musical instrument played by the wind. The music has no beat, rhythm, set notes or time signature, giving it an unpredictable and ephemeral quality."
Hugh McLachlan, TAS
Hugh McLachlan trained as a Gold and Silversmith at RMIT, Melbourne in the mid-1970’s and in 1980 established McLachlan Studio with his wife Mary in rural Tasmania. Making designer jewellery for McLachlan is like making sculpture in miniature. He has found that his physical environment and the years of transforming complex three-dimensional forms into wearable pieces of jewellery has had a big impact on the way he approaches sculpture. The polished surface is increasingly becoming an important element for McLachlan, marine grade stainless steel highly polished to a mirror finish. His sculpture has the ability to contain form and create space at the same time through the illusion of the reflected surface. It explores how light plays with our perception of the world through reflection, distortion and the way we see ourselves in this illusion of a new environment. In 2011 McLachlan received the inaugural Dick Bett Memorial Invitation Subsidy for a Tasmanian Artist to exhibit at Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi. He is represented in numerous collections including the NGA and has participated in many solo and joint exhibitions both in Australia and overseas.
Elaine Clocherty, WA
Elaine Clocherty has 12 years experience in the creation of site-specific ephemeral environmental art. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (Fine Arts) from Curtin University, Western Australia which included an exchange to the Environmental Art Department at the Glasgow School of Art. After an outdoor exhibition in Glasgow, Elaine returned to WA and completed an Honors degree in Sustainable Development and Social Ecology at Murdoch University, WA. Clocherty’s discipline involves interacting with place and using local natural materials that often go unnoticed, to create works that contemplate individual and societal connection with nature. She has been involved in many outdoor exhibitions including winning the Andrea Stretton Memorial Invitation to Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe and Bondi 2012, and the Byron Bay Sculpture Biennial 2010. She was also awarded the Western Australian Sculptor Scholarship alongside fellow artist Kerrie Argent at Cottesloe in 2014.
Elaine Miles, VIC
Elaine Miles is a Melbourne based artist working in installation, sculpture and performance. Her exhibitions and commission history is extensive within Australia and overseas and includes over 85 exhibitions at artist run spaces and other venues such as the Sydney Arts Festival, the National Museum of Singapore, Roulette Experimental Sound Space (New York), Melbourne Recital Centre, Federation Square, Wagga Wagga Regional Art Gallery (The National Glass Centre) and various state run Craft Councils. Her sculptural installations have been included in several National Sculpture Competitions and in 2012 Miles completed her first major permanent outdoor art commission within the City of Wyndham titled “Indoor/Outdoor”. She has taken up sculpture and glass residencies in Germany and USA and holds degrees in Ceramic Design, Applied Arts (hons), Fine Arts (masters) and PhD in Fine Arts and is currently an Associate Lecturer in Fine Arts at Monash University. Elaine Miles was the winner of the 2008 Civic Choice Award in the prestigious Melbourne Prize for Urban Sculpture Award and was also the feature of an ABC documentary, Artists At Work. Miles’ artwork appears in numerous public and private collections in Australia and America.
Ralph Tikerpae, NSW
Ralph Tikerpae sculpts in a variety of media both subtractive and additive but he particularly enjoys pre-loved metal and clay. His sculpture tries to pare images to a basic element or essence and has been called drawing in space. These include theatrical elements or icons where symbols become players on a stage. His work also combines elements of time and position overlapped with positive and negative elements. Curators have commented that his large metal works are the equivalent of semi abstract drawings in space. They explore the actions of humanity from social events to domestic farces. Tikerpae believes that his metal and wood sculptures operate on different levels of the subconscious. He has always enjoyed the element of chance found within the construction of his metal sculpture. He believes in the resurfacing of past lives through an artist’s subconscious trance when creating art. In a similar way he hopes that each viewer’s past experiences are awakened when they experience a piece of art work that connects with their past soul. He hopes that when people see his art that they recognize something that they already subconsciously recognise. Recycled steel in particular facilitates this experience due to its surface patina which echo’s its past lives, experiences and owners.
Geoffrey Drake-Brockman, WA
Geoffrey Drake-Brockman specialises in interactive robotic and optical installations, in addition to working with large-scale metal fabrication and other sculptural media. Drake-Brockman was born in Woomera, South Australia in 1964 and is based in Perth, Western Australia. He studied Computer Science at The University of Western Australia before completing a Masters degree in Visual Arts at Curtin University. The artist has been exhibiting since 1986 with shows in Perth, Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Singapore, Denmark, New York, and London. He has shown work at the National Gallery of Australia, the Singapore Art Museum, the Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi, Cottesloe, and Aarhus (Denmark) and has received the Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award. His public art commissions include the robotic sculpture Totem at the Perth Arena, and Spiral at the Western Australian Police Headquarters.
Samantha Stephenson, NSW
Samantha Stephenson was born in Sydney, Australia in 1987. She has recently completed a Bachelor of Fine Art (majoring in sculpture) at the National Art School and is predominantly working in the medium of mild steel. Stephenson was a finalist at Sculpture at Sawmillers, McMahons Point in March 2014 and has been selected for a Clitheroe Foundation Emerging Sculptor Mentorship Program as part of her involvement in Sculpture by the Sea, 2014.
Grahame Wilson, NSW
Grahame Wilson has played with form and function for the last 35 years in his professional life as a sail maker and marine trimmer, his credo being “I don’t do ugly!”. There is rarely a straight line nor a symmetrical side on a boat and so there is an unwritten law, “if it looks right then it is… usually!”. Wilson has taken this attitude into his next 'phase of life', that of a sculptor. He has chosen, always, to be a gentleman.
Brad Jackson, WA
Brad Jackson is a multi-disciplinary artist working primarily with metals. He emerged into the art world as an artist blacksmith. Being intensively trained at the exclusive blacksmithing workshops at the National Trust listed railway workshops at Eveleigh, Sydney, he learned both his trade to a high international standard and also the various complimentary trades that could assist in creating artworks. Jackson has worked throughout Australia on many projects and studied internationally. He have been involved in large installations in Port Hedland, was awarded a Churchill Fellowship in 2011 to study internationally, featured in international Artist Blacksmith publications, has been sought after by national heritage bodies such as the National Trust and has sculptural artwork featured in a number of private residences around Australia. Public art is the main focus of his career with artworks being acquired by Gold Coast City Council, Dianella City Council, Fremantle Hospital, Maida Vale Primary School and Rio Tinto. Jackson has been a featured artist in several sculpture festivals in Western Australia.
Nicholas Uhlmann, SA
Nicholas Uhlmann is a sculptor living and working in the Adelaide Hills, South Australia. He was born in 1974. He completed a BA Visual Art in 2002, majoring in sculpture, at the Adelaide College of the Arts. Whilst still a student, Uhlmann invented a distinctive method of wrapping steel armatures in layers of thin metallic strips. Since then he has developed and refined this organic constructivist technique through the creation of over 150 sculptures. He has held eight solo shows and exhibited in over 50 group shows and outdoor sculpture awards throughout Australia and overseas. Within the last five years his work has proved successful in being scaled up for the public realm, including the installation of three large-scale sculptures for Housing SA’s UNO apartment development in the Adelaide CBD. Recently he has been awarded the Oz Minerals Copper Sculpture Award and won first prize in the Richard Cohen Memorial Sculpture Competition. He is about to embark on the creation of five outdoor sculptures for the New Royal Adelaide Hospital, winning major public art funding from Arts SA.
Machine Green, NSW
Machine Green (lead by Harry Vasutabu) is a group whose goal is not to give people a machine that can grow food, but to spark an idea that food is its own language and it is up for your own interpretation. Machine Green’s sustainable food pyramid sculptures (both inside and their large outdoor work) question the conventional methods used to grow food. The key concept is to employ technology to take advantage of free and abundant resources (sunlight and water) to output food, and thereby make it sustainable. It is important for the group that many of the plants used are edible and that their sculptures utilise recycled and are appropriated materials. “We are what we eat. How have we become so disconnected from the food we eat? Do we know where and how our meals originate and the processes used to cultivate them? Was the transition from hunter to farmer sustainable? Questions like these drive Machine Green’s passion for their work”. Machine Green
Linton Meagher, NSW
Born in 1975 in Sydney, Linton Meagher studied art at the Julian Ashton School and at the University of Sydney, completing a Bachelor of Arts majoring in Fine Arts. Meagher’s work explores the ways that various disparate, mass-produced objects can be taken out of their usual context and presented in a way that challenges the viewer to question their wider meaning in society. Meagher’s semi-sculptural works use resin to cast objects in clear Perspex, thereby creating the effect of objects floating in space. By casting mass-produced items in resin, his work continues the exploration of consumerism, beauty, death and the impermanence of time. His works, such as those featuring imitation lipsticks cast in resin, prompt the viewer to contemplate our ideas of beauty in an age of consumerism. Meagher’s work is represented by galleries in Sydney, Hong Kong and London. He has had many exhibitions over the past decade and is represented by numerous private and corporate collections.
Paul Bacon, NSW
It is the artist’s quest to transform impressions into satisfying, honest artworks. It is the achievement of this that separates good, real art from sentimental illustrations or cold technical exercises. Sonia Legge 2007. “Making these sculptures is a process of drawing an instant, a memory, a side long glance or a long hard look into a physical form. I try to keep the pieces open, allow white space and emptiness to talk as much as the line and shapes I introduce. I build with a growing language of ciphers and glyphs. Elements re-occur, providing a point of reference around which to make different explorations of narrative and composition. In the end the sculptures should have a resonance, an elegance that speaks in its own voice of that first impression that caught my eye, that sat in my mind, that asked to be made”. Paul Bacon. Bacon’s works have evolved from a series of small landscape sketches from along the Golden Highway in New South Wales.
Julie Collins & Derek John, VIC
Julie Collins has been a professional exhibiting sculptor for over 25 years, specialising in large public art works. She is also a public art consultant, giving her understanding from both sides of projects. Derek John is a steel fabricator by trade, mastering many materials and processes. He is also a fabricator for numerous Australian sculptors including Simon Perry and John Kelly, helping them to achieve public projects. Collins and John have been collaborating on sculptural projects for 14 years. They have exhibited in 27 solo exhibitions and over 112 group exhibitions within Australia and overseas. Their public works are held within the City of Manningham in Victoria, Shunde in China and St Michael’s Catholic Church in Melbourne, amongst many other sites. Their works are also included in several significant private collections in Australia. The artist’s wish is that their work will help raise awareness of the vulnerabilities of our planet and the effects man has on it.
Andrew Hankin, NSW
"My real passion is to create work that people can enjoy. Work that makes people smile. I'm always looking for ideas with a message. Ideas that can make people think".
Mikaela Castledine, WA
Mikaela Castledine has been working as a professional artist since 1992. She has participated in many solo and group shows in Perth winning several prizes. Born in the Wheatbelt of WA, Castledine grew up in the Perth hills in a family of artists and makers. She has qualifications in science and interior design, is a published writer and has been studying for a Masters in writing and literature. While Castledine is known for her two dimensional work in paper collage, since winning the 2013 Sculpture Scholarship at Sculpture by the Sea, Cottesloe she has been concentrating her attention on her three dimensional crochet work. “The one horned Indian rhinoceros, like most rhino species, are rare and endangered and will soon become as mythical as they were once believed to be”. Mikaela Castledine
Alex Lyne, VIC
Alex Lyne is currently in the midst of realising a new body of work that promises to showcase images derived from the subconscious made real. This is achieved through a deep understanding of material and making processes. Over nearly two decades Lyne’s artistic practice has transitioned from photographer and designer, through foundry technician, to sculptor. Pursuing a passion for the ancient art of Cire Perdue (the lost wax method of casting bronze) has lead Lyne to post graduate study and collaborations with significant sculptors and founders both in Australia and the U.K.Initially, Lyne studied and practiced techniques of sculpture production and bronze casting in London. He then returned to Australia to share his newfound knowledge with others and expand these skills. He completed a significant master apprentice style education with one of Australia’s premiere fine art bronze foundry’s, and then consolidated this learning by undertaking Post Graduate studies (Art in the Public Space) at RMIT University. Over the last few years Lyne has shifted his focus from learning to teaching at Monash University.
Francesca Mataraga, NSW
Francesca Mataraga is an artist living and working in Sydney, Australia. Her work is cross-disciplinary and incorporates drawing, painting, photography, digital drawing, sculpture and installation. Her practice originates in painting and is situated within the tradition of abstraction, minimalism and post-minimalism. Her focus is three dimensional painting and it’s relationship to minimalism, installation, twentieth century abstraction and modernism with an emphasis on colour. Mataraga has exhibited in Sydney, Melbourne, Los Angeles and Berlin and has also been a finalist in several exhibitions and prizes including Sculpture by the Sea, Harbour Sculpture, the Sunshine Coast Art Prize 3D, the Tim Olsen Drawing Prize, the Blake Prize and Touring Exhibition, the Woollahra Small Sculpture Prize and the Jacaranda Aquisite Drawing Award. Mataraga was awarded a PhD from COFA, UNSW in 2012. She has also completed a Master of Fine Arts (in painting) at the College of Fine UNSW in 2008, a Bachelor of Fine Arts (painting) at the National Art School in 2002 and a Bachelor of Arts – Art History and Theory (honours) at Sydney University in 1994. She has been an Artist in residence at Artspace, Culture at Work and Bundanon, and has been recipient of several significant grants and scholarships.
Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi to Coogee
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