Jul 1, 2015

Freedom for Baltic states

The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia 1940-1991

Baltic graffiti on the Berlin Wall

The protest wall
Towards the end of the Second World War, many Latvians, Lithuanians and Estonians fled their homes to avoid the second Soviet occupation. They created strong exile communities and continued the struggle against the occupation of the Baltic States. One form that this struggle took was the organization of protests. Divided Germany was a symbol of the Cold War,but from 1961 the Berlin Wall was a symbol of the Iron Curtain. The Wall was created to stop people escaping from East Germany to West Berlin. Ironically, the West Berlin side of the Wall became the "largest canvas in the world". Many of the paintings were directed against the Soviet regime, and some of them were created by exile Latvians.

The head of Mikhael Gorbachev – referring to the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan and the Baltic States.

The Soviet regime carried out a massive russification process in all the Baltic States

The USSR occupied the Baltic states twice – from 1940. - 1941. and from 1944. - 1991.

The USSR occupied the Baltic states twice – from 1940. - 1941. and from 1944. - 1991.

The bear is one of the symbols of Soviet Russia.

The bear is one of the symbols of Soviet Russia.

"Freedom for the Baltic States" – this slogan also appeared in French and German.

Near Checkpoint Charlie.

Freedom for Latvia! Author: Gundars Jēgers

"Daugav' abas malas" - first accords of national song.

Freedom for Latvia! Author: Gundars Jēgers

Lai Dzīvo Latvija - Long live Latvia. Author: Gints Grīnbergs. The first Latvian graffiti in 1984.

Shortly after the work.

The very first piece to be removed from the Berlin Wall in November 1989 had graffiti calling for the repeal of the Hitler-Stalin Pact.

"Without Your language You are s**t!" A strong emotional expression against russification policy in Latvia.

The Hitler-Stalin Pact of 1939 (also known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact)
contained a secret protocol dividing Eastern Europe into German and Soviet
spheres of interest.

The best location was in the center of Berlin, in front of the Brandenburg Gate.

The Museum of the Occupation of Latvia 1940-1991
Credits: Story

Author of the idea - Pēteris Elferts
Curator - Kārlis Dambītis
Digitization of images - Evita Rukke

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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