Listing 2018

Historic England

Fourteen remarkable places listed by Historic England in 2018

Pedestrian subway beneath Crystal Palace Parade, Bromley and Southwark, Greater London, Chris Redgrave, Historic England, 2018-12-11, From the collection of: Historic England
In 2018 Historic England added 952 new entries to the National Heritage List for England
The National Heritage List for England identifies the buildings, sites and landscapes which receive special protection, so they can be enjoyed by current and future generations. In 2018, 952 new entries were added to the list. The following fourteen buildings, landscapes and monuments offer a glimpse of the depth and breadth of England's historic environment given recognition for their special significance in 2018.
The Old Lifeboat House, East Terrace, Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex, Pat Payne, Historic England, 2018-11-21, From the collection of: Historic England
Old Lifeboat House, Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex
The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) was founded in 1824 as the National Institution for the Preservation of Life from Shipwreck. Walton's Lifeboat House was built in 1884 to designs by CH Cooke, the RNLI's architect. Baroness Bolsover officially launched Walton's first lifeboat at a ceremony held outside the Lifeboat House on 18 November 1884.

Old Lifeboat House, Walton-on-the-Naze, Essex

Read the List entry for the Old Lifeboat House.

Florence Mine pit head, Egremont, Cumbria, Alun Bull, Historic England, 2018-12-04, From the collection of: Historic England
Florence iron mining pit head, Florence Mine, Egremont, Cumbria
The iron mining pit head at the former Florence Mine is the best surviving example in England. Work began at the site in 1913 and a second shaft was sunk in the 1940s, with the pit head opening in 1947. British Steel closed the site in 1980 but small-scale mining continued until 2006. 

Florence iron mining pit head, Florence Mine, Egremont, Cumbria

Read the List entry for Florence iron mining pit head.

Central Hall, Campus West, University of York, Heslington, York, Alun Bull, Historic England, 2018-04-24, From the collection of: Historic England
Central Hall, University of York, Heslington, York
The University of York was one of seven new universities established in post-war England. Its striking Central Hall was built in 1966-8 to designs by Robert Matthew, Johnson-Marshall & Partners (RMJM). The design enables the hall to be multipurpose, having retractable seating and a removable sectional stage.

Central Hall, University of York, Heslington, York

Read the List entry for Central Hall.

Campus West, University of York, Heslington, York, Dave MacLeod, English Heritage, 2011-09-15, From the collection of: Historic England
University of York Campus West designed landscape, Heslington, York
The designed landscape for the University of York Campus West was laid out between 1963 and 1980. It was designed by Robert Matthew, Johnson-Marshall & Partners (RMJM) and incorporates a formal landscape belonging to Heslington Hall, a 16th century country house built for the politician Sir Thomas Eynns.
Derwent College and Heslington Hall, University of York, Heslington, York, James O Davies, English Heritage, 2009-07-20, From the collection of: Historic England

University of York Campus West designed landscape, Heslington, York

Read the List entries for the designed landscape and Heslington Hall.

University of York Campus West designed landscape, Heslington, York

30 Coptic Street and 35 Little Russell Street, Holborn, Camden, Greater London, Chris Redgrave, Historic England, 2018-11-30, From the collection of: Historic England
30 Coptic Street and 35 Little Russell Street, Camden, Greater London
30 Coptic Street and 35 Russell Street were built in 1888 to designs by RP Wellcock for the Dairy Supply Company. This was a subsidiary of the Express Dairy Company, which by 1885 was importing fifty per cent of London's milk sourced from outside the city. 30 Coptic Street was used as a dairy and 35 Little Russell Street was used as a warehouse and laboratory until after the Second World War.

30 Coptic Street and 35 Little Russell Street, Camden, Greater London

Read the List entry for 30 Coptic Street and 35 Little Russell Street.

The dining area of Hopkins House, Downshire Hill, Hampstead, Greater London, James O Davies, Historic England, 2016-11-25, From the collection of: Historic England
Hopkins House, Downshire Hill, Camden, Greater London
Hopkins House, was built as a private house and office for themselves by the architects Michael and Patty Hopkins. Constructed in 1975-6, the  'High-Tech' design incorporates a 2 m x 4 m structural steel grid. The architects were influenced by the Eames Case Study House of 1949.
Hopkins House, Downshire Hill, Hampstead, Greater London, James O Davies, Historic England, 2016-11-30, From the collection of: Historic England

Hopkins House, Downshire Hill, Camden, Greater London

Read the List entry for Hopkins House.

Hopkins House, Downshire Hill, Camden, Greater London

Caynton Manor Gatehouse, Caynton, Edgmond, Shropshire, James O Davies, Historic England, 2018-07-10, From the collection of: Historic England
Gatehouse to former Caynton Manor, Caynton, Shropshire
The surviving gatehouse at Caynton was built in around 1635 for William Yonge. The associated manor house was apparently demolished or destroyed by the end of the 17th century. Principally built in red brick, the gatehouse features rooms to either side of a central passageway with two rooms above. It was later converted to farm use.
South room, first floor, Caynton Manor Gatehouse, Edgmond, Shropshire, James O Davies, Historic England, 2018-07-10, From the collection of: Historic England

Gatehouse to former Caynton Manor, Caynton, Shropshire

Read the List entry for the Gatehouse.

Wing Test Hangar, Watnall Road, Hucknall, Nottingham, Pat Payne, Historic England, 2018-11-30, From the collection of: Historic England
Wing Test Hangar, Hucknall, Nottingham
The Wing Test Hangar was built by Rolls Royce in 1944 for the testing and development of aviation engines. These included the wartime development of the Merlin engine, which was adapted for the American Mustang fighter, and the first commercially viable turboprop engine, the Dart, was tested here.
Wing Test Hangar interior, Watnall Road, Hucknall, Nottingham, Pat Payne, Historic England, 2018-11-30, From the collection of: Historic England
Dynamometre Control Centre, Wing Test Hangar, Watnall Road, Hucknall, Nottingham, Pat Payne, Historic England, 2018-11-30, From the collection of: Historic England

Wing Test Hangar, Hucknall, Nottingham

Read the List entry for the Wing Test Hangar.

Lighthouse and tidal observatory, South Pier, Newlyn, Cornwall, Peter Williams, English Heritage, 2006-03-28, From the collection of: Historic England
Tidal Observatory, South Pier, Newlyn, Cornwall
In the 1880s a new harbour and two piers were constructed at the fishing town of Newlyn. The South Pier was extended in the early 20th century and a tidal observatory built next to a new lighthouse. The observatory was one of three constructed at the request of the Ordnance Survey to establish Mean Sea Level.

Tidal Observatory, South Pier, Newlyn, Cornwall

Read the List entry for the Tidal Observatory.

Pedestrian subway beneath Crystal Palace Parade, Bromley and Southwark, Greater London, Chris Redgrave, Historic England, 2018-12-11, From the collection of: Historic England
Subway, Vestibule, Terrace and Stairs to the Crystal Palace
The subway, vestibule, terrace and stairs were built in 1865 to link a new train station directly to the entrance of the Crystal Palace. The original Crystal Palace was built to house the Great Exhibition that took place in Hyde Park in 1851. It was later dismantled and rebuilt at Sydenham Hill. The subway was originally listed Grade II in 1972 and has been upgraded to Grade II*.

Subway, Vestibule, Terrace and Stairs to the Crystal Palace

Read the List entry for the Subway, Vestibule, Terrace and Stairs.

The Assembly Rooms, Charlton, Greenwich, Greater London, Chris Redgrave, Historic England, 2018-12-04, From the collection of: Historic England
The Assembly Rooms, Charlton
Charlton Assembly Rooms, a community hall, was built in 1881. It was designed by J Rowland in the Jacobean Revival style. Its construction was funded by the wealthy benefactor, Sir Spencer Maryon-Wilson, who lived in the nearby Grade I listed Charlton House. The decoration of the Assembly Rooms features his family Coat of Arms.
The stage and hall, The Assembly Rooms, Charlton, Greenwich, Greater London, Chris Redgrave, Historic England, 2018-12-04, From the collection of: Historic England

The Assembly Rooms, Charlton

Read the List entries for the Assembly Rooms and Charlton House.

The Assembly Rooms, Charlton

Late prehistoric walled settlement, Gilmonby, County Durham, Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, 1994-02-10, From the collection of: Historic England
Late prehistoric walled settlement, Gilmonby, County Durham
This Scheduled Monument, situated close to the East Mellwaters farmhouse, sits adjacent to Sleightholme Beck. It is a rare form of a late prehistoric settlement. High status enclosures like this were formed of stone and have now been reduced to stony earthworks. This aerial photograph shows the remains of a deep stone wall enclosing what were once circular stone huts.
Late prehistoric walled settlement, Gilmonby, County Durham, Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England, 1994-02-10, From the collection of: Historic England

Late prehistoric walled settlement, Gilmonby, County Durham

Read the List entry for the walled settlement.

Cattle Trough and Drinking Fountain, Spaniards Road, Hampstead, Greater London, Chris Redgrave, Historic England, 2018-12-10, From the collection of: Historic England
Cattle Trough and Drinking Fountain, Spaniards Road, Hampstead, Greater London
Cattle troughs were once commonplace in Britain. The Metropolitan Drinking Fountain and Cattle Trough Association was established in 1859 to provide free drinking water and was responsible for over 1,000 troughs. A large number of these have now been lost. The example in Spaniards Road, Hampstead is believed to have been erected in 1916, making it a late example of its type.

Cattle Trough and Drinking Fountain, Spaniards Road, Hampstead, Greater London

Read the List entry for the Cattle Trough and Drinking Fountain.

Former Otterington Railway Station, Station Road, South Otterington, North Yorkshire, Alun Bull, Historic England, 2018-12-11, From the collection of: Historic England
Former Otterington Railway Station, South Otterington, North Yorkshire
A railway line between York and Darlington opened in 1841, and by 1843 a station had opened at Otterington. Most of the station buildings were demolished an replaced in 1932-3 as part of a widening scheme that increased the line to four tracks. The new buildings were designed by Robert Alexander Darling, who worked at the Architects' Section of the London North Eastern Railway, based at York.

Former Otterington Railway Station, South Otterington, North Yorkshire

Read the List entry for the Former Otterington Railway Station.

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Historic England is the public body that helps people care for, enjoy and celebrate England's spectacular historic environment, from beaches and battlefields to parks and pie shops.

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