2004 - 2019

Nobel Labs 360°

Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Visit Nobel Laureates in their laboratories and learn more about their award-winning research. A joint project by photographer Volker Steger and the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Theodor Hänsch, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Theodor Hänsch received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2005 together with Roy J. Glauber and John L. Hall "for their contributions to the development of laser-based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique." In this Nobel Lab 360°, Nobel Laureate in Physics Theodor Hänsch presents his lab at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics.

Brian Schmidt, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Brian Schmidt received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2011 together with Saul Perlmutter and Adam G. Riess "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae". Visit Brian Schmidt’s lab and learn more about the specific lens techniques Schmidt uses to observe and determine the composition of the universe.

Dan Shechtman, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Dan Shechtman received the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for the discovery of quasicrystals". In contrast to the periodic structure of a crystal, quasicrystals are molecules that are arranged in a quasiperiodical pattern. Visit Dan Shechtman’s lab to learn more about quasiperiodic molecule structures. Dan Shechtman even opens up his private home for you as you walk through the Nobel Lab 360°.

Martin Chalfie, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Martin Chalfie received a Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008 "for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP." Enter Chalfie’s laboratory and find out more about his groundbreaking technique of using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) to localise gene activity. Linger over various working stations where young scientsts illustrate their research techniques to clarify gene expression processes.

Alvin Roth, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Alvin E. Roth received the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2012 together with Lloyd S. Shapley "for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design". A round tour through his lab makes you familiar with game theory and designing market research.

John Mather, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

John Mather received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2006 together with George F. Smoot "for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation". Once you enter John Mather’s Nobel Lab, you’ll find out more about the Goddard Space Flight Center - a NASA research center, where the Background Explorer (COBE) satellite was tested that eventually let to the prize-winning discoveries.

Elizabeth Blackburn, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Elizabeth H. Blackburn received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2009 together with Carol W. Greider and Jack W. Szostak "for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase". Visit her lab and find out more about the fascinating mechanisms that make telomeres work in cells.

George Smoot, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

George Smoot received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2006 together with John C. Mather "for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation". In his Nobel Lab 360°, George Smoot informs you of the inner life of sensors as well as of the Planck satellite which creates maps of the sky. He also presents his international office corners.

Ben Feringa, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Ben Feringa received the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry together with Fraser Stoddart and Jean-Pierre Sauvage "for the design and synthesis of molecular machines". Visit his Nobel Lab 360° to find out more about his ground-breaking research.

Serge Haroche, Volker Steger/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Serge Haroche received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2012 together with David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems". Serge Haroche will take you on a stunning, virtual tour through his lab at Collège de France in Paris.

Arthur McDonald, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Arthur B. McDonald received the Nobel Prize in Physics 2015 together with Takaaki Kajita "for the discovery of neutrino oscillations, which shows that neutrinos have mass". McDonald will take you on a fascinating, rich-media tour through his lab.

Bruce Beutler, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

How does our body respond to foreign antigens? How long does it take to track down a mutation? Why does our immune system turn against us? Visit Bruce Beutler’s Nobel Lab 360° to find out how the mammalian immune system operates and with which techniques it can be measured.

Aaron Ciechanover, Volker Steger, From the collection of: Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Aaron Ciechanover received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2004 together with Avram Hershko and Irwin Rose "for the discovery of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation". Visit Aaron Ciechanover’s lab and find out more about the molecule called ubiquitin responsible for regulated protein degradation occurring in processes of cell division, DNA repair or quality control of proteins. Ciechanover also lets you in on his personal motives for leading a life as a scientist.

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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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