December 2017 - March 2018

The Eye's Journey: Part Three

Texo Foundation

Explore 'The Eye's Journey' exhibition as part of the Nasta Collection at the Texo Foundation

The Hours Wound (from The Empty Percentage series), Marcelo Medina, 2007, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Marcelo Medina (1979)
The work on display is part of his series The Empty Percentage. In it, the artist counters conventional presentation of painting with a canvas precariously stapled to a bare stretcher, as if the canvas never really found its place on the support. The series addresses the thousands of young Paraguayans who have left the country for Spain to seek work, and the work deals with families torn apart, dislocation, impossibility and frustration, and affect.
Untitled, Ricardo Larán, 2009, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Ricardo Larán (1969-2016)
Since the nineties, Ricardo has produced figurative work with flat and stark colors akin to pop graphics and an unbridled approach to color and theme. He has painted scenes from daily life, flowers, still life, and profiles. While the work on exhibit refers to a real place (a drive-in movie theater), it creates, thanks to the combination of elements used, a fantastic atmosphere.
Pentimento, Félix Toranzos, 2005, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Félix Toranzos (1962)
This work is a large canvas of what was the ceiling of the Paraguayan German Cultural Institute in Asunción. The size of the canvas accentuates the vigor of the painting, a presence in its own right.
Studio. Tribute to Samudio, Félix Toranzos, 2007, From the collection of: Texo Foundation

In his triptych Atelier (Studio), Toranzos pays tribute to Juan Anselmo Samudio, a major figure in Paraguayan painting from the first half of the twentieth century.

Studio. Tribute to Samudio, Félix Toranzos, 2007, From the collection of: Texo Foundation

In this work, the artists reflects on the image and painting.

Studio. Tribute to Samudio, Félix Toranzos, 2007, From the collection of: Texo Foundation

He worked on the basis of original photographs of Samudio's studio taken in 1905, which he rendered on canvas after intervening on them digitally; finally, he placed the canvases on small stretchers inside crates.

From The Kabala series, Margarita Morselli, 1994, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Margarita Morselli (1952)
Morselli explores the color and the random course of form in a highly expressive work that is part of a series on the kabala, indeed, that is its name.
Untitled, Oscar Centurión Frontanilla, 2011, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Oscar Centurión (1955)
The work on unprimed canvas makes use of the colors in the French and Paraguayan flags; it formed part of the artist's most recent show.
A warm night, Osvaldo Salerno, 2008, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Osvaldo Salerno (1952)
Osvaldo Salerno has worked multiple languages (engraving, painting, video, installation). This work corresponds to a series dedicated to the Shakespearean figure of Ophelia. By giving the piece object form, Salerno goes beyond the limits of painting, and by working directly on a reproduction of the well-known Ophelia work, he questions its originality.
Terminal, Mónica Matiauda, 2010, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Monica Matiauda (1978)
A photographer by trade, Matiauda uses photographs as the point of reference in her paintings. She presents situations in ordinary places where anonymous characters are in motion. The work on exhibit is a painting of an urban scene, specifically a bus terminal. The action of rendering the theme in painting and, in so doing, removing the precise information that photography provides, places the work in another plane of reality.
From the Juggling series, Patricia Silva, 2010, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Patricia Silva (1962)
In her work, Silva addresses kids who live on the street. The characters on a completely impersonal flat white background overflow the limits of the support to become three dimensional.
From the Juggling series, Patricia Silva, 2010, From the collection of: Texo Foundation

Though there is no perspective and it is as if the characters were floating, the atmosphere is one of playfulness and alliance.

Mandalas and Gratitud, Gilda Martínez Yaryes, 2008, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Gilda Martínez Yaryes (1957)
Martínez Yaryes makes a digital montage from fragments of photographs of butterfly wings taken from the Internet. She later prints the resulting abstract composition (like mandalas or fractals) on canvas in limited editions.
Untitled, Selmo Martínez, 1988, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Selmo Martínez (1948)
Martínez is known for fantastic figuration with threatening creatures that emerge from the place. These presences are powerful and disturbing, yet somehow unreal.
Keep walking bench, Pedro Barrail, 2012, From the collection of: Texo Foundation
Pedro Barrail (1964)
Keep walking bench, the third piece from his Darwin series, is a bench with versions in wood, marble, and metal. The object is based on a diagram rendered using a register of bird sounds. The lines in the diagram were used to determine the shape of the bench's legs, its most striking characteristic. The work on exhibit is the meta version of the bench.
Texo Foundation
Credits: Story

Photographs © Ana Ayala
Curatorship and texts by © Adriana Almada

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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