Delaware Art Museum

Delaware Art Museum

Highlights from the Permanent Collection

Early American
Works from the Early American Collection

Inness painted this autumn scene of an old, gnarled tree in the flat New Jersey meadows near his home in Montclair. He was a close observer of atmospheric effects. In this late-afternoon scene the dark clouds and swirling leaves suggest an approaching storm.

While in South America, Church made sketches that served as inspiration for major paintings that he produced in his New York studio. This panoramic landscape represents a combination of sites seen and sketched in South America, not a single location.

Inspired by the Apocryphal book of Tobit, this painting depicts the return of Tobias to his blind father’s home with a fish whose gall is supposed to cure blindness. The figure at the far right is the angel Raphael who accompanied Tobias on his journey.

Pre-Raphaelite
Highlights from the Pre-Raphaelite Collection

'Found' depicts the poignant moment when a young farmer, arriving in London to sell his calf at market, discovers his sweetheart, now a prostitute left destitute on the streets of the metropolis.

In this painting, a beautiful, if somewhat Amazonian, woman is attended by three equally attractive servants. The setting is clearly classical in inspiration. Solomon visited Italy and Pompeii in 1867, and much of the interior may be based on an actual Pompeian fresco.

Rossetti completed the sonnet entitled La Bella Mano a year after the painting, suggesting the visual representation may have been the inspiration for the poem. The two stanzas which appear on the frame are in Italian, a language in which Rossetti was fluent from an early age.

The work of Shakespeare was particularly revered by the Pre-Raphaelites. In this painting, Brown captures the romantic and poignant moment in the early dawn on Juliet’s balcony, when Romeo parts from his love for what will be the final time.

Solomon was an important if unusual figure in the Victorian period. Jewish by descent, he was born into a family of painters. He often painted Old Testament subjects such as this one, taken from the life of Moses. Unlike earlier depictions in which the heroic aspects of Moses’ life are depicted, Solomon has chosen a more intimate moment.

Although the model for this painting has not been identified, it may have been Rossetti’s housemaid, whose name has come down to us in the present day only as “Mary.” She personifies the archetypical Pre-Raphaelite notion of beauty with her red hair, large lips, and enticing brown eyes.

Howard Pyle 
Highlights of American Illustration

When Pyle's illustrations for “The Fate of a Treasure Town” appeared in 1905, they were - according to one early Pyle biographer - "the sensation of the magazine world... marvelously rich in color...dramatically stirring, and vividly romantic."

In 1897 Scribner’s Magazine commissioned Pyle to create twelve illustrations to accompany a year-long serialization of Henry Cabot Lodge’s “Story of the Revolution.” Here Pyle shows Thomas Jefferson as the primary author of the Declaration of Independence.

Pyle depicts a scene of a 1874 civil disturbance during armed conflict over the disputed Arkansas gubernatorial election of 1872. One faction, led by James Brooks, forcibly took over the state capitol building.

In 1897 Scribner’s Magazine commissioned Pyle to create twelve illustrations to accompany a year-long serialization of Henry Cabot Lodge’s “Story of the Revolution.” The Attack upon the Chew House depicts Washington’s troops attacking on the British General Howe’s encampment at Germantown, PA, headquartered at the Chew House, in October of 1777.

Pyle's retelling of the British medieval adventures of King Arthur and his knights invited middle-class American boys to aspire to manly virtues.

Pyle's retelling of the British medieval adventures of King Arthur and his knights invited middle-class American boys to aspire to manly virtues.

Pyle's story captures the dangers of piracy in waters around the Spanish colonial ports of Central and South America in the seventeenth century, when ships carrying the wealth of Central and South America to the Spanish crown were often attacked by pirates who later divided the riches among themselves.

Modern & Contemporary
Highlights from the 20th and 21st Century

Although best known for his depictions of New York street life, George Luks also had a great passion for landscape painting which he developed on summer trips to Nova Scotia, Maine, the Berkshires, and the Adirondacks. This dramatic painting was executed in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, near Lake Rossignol.

Ernest Lawson, a native of Canada, studied with American Impressionists John Twachtman and J. Alden Weir and traveled to France, where his acquaintance with the painter Alfred Sisley reinforced a direction toward a personal style derived from impressionism. In 1898 Lawson moved to Washington Heights, New York, near the sparsely populated farmlands along the Harlem River.

roduced for the Socialist newspaper the New York Call, Sloan's drawing comments on the hazardous conditions that led to the deaths of 146 garment workers, mostly young immigrant women, in a fire at the Triangle Waist Company in Lower Manhattan.

Credits: Story

All rights reserved. © 2015 Delaware Art Museum.

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Translate with Google
Home
Explore
Nearby
Profile