Cultural Fabric

Brenda Crabtree, Gaye Fowler, Kajola Morewood, & Michelle Sound

Artists from Cultural Fabric (2018)Craft Council of British Columbia

Indigenous artistic expressions continually shift in response to cultural circumstances and facilitates the reinvention and reinterpretation of traditional practices. This exhibition challenges notions about how Indigenous art is created and perceived, with works ranging from a variety of artistic disciplines and materials including; fur, hide, wool, and cedar. Pictured here during the open reception (from left to right) Gaye Fowler, Kajola Morewood, Brenda Crabtree, Michelle Sound

Atahk (Bright Star) (2017) by Michelle SoundCraft Council of British Columbia

Michelle Sound

Michelle Sound is a Swan River First Nation Cree and Red River Metis born and raised in Coast Salish territory. She completed her Bachelors of Fine Arts at Simon Fraser University and her Master of Applied Arts from Emily Carr University of Art + Design. 

Untitled (Trapline Series) by Michelle SoundCraft Council of British Columbia

Her artwork often explores her identity from a personal experience rooted in family and history. She is inspired by the many Aboriginal women throughout our communities who adapt, create, and are the backbone of our families and communities. She is interested in exploring the materials used in textile and cultural production.

Untitled and Home #3 by Kajola MorewoodCraft Council of British Columbia

Kajola Morewood

Kajola Morewood completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts at Emily Carr University of Art + Design. While her academic training focused mainly on photography, her body of work includes everything from drawing to embroidery to drum making.

Landscape (1,2, & 3) by Kajola MorewoodCraft Council of British Columbia

She is of Inuit ancestry and was raised in an adoptive family. Over the years, she has spent time learning about Inuit art and culture which is reflected in her current body of work. She has been exploring the idea of home (real and imagined) and is also interested in the line between women's craft and contemporary fine art, especially in how it relates to her mixed Inuit/European heritage.

Metis Octopus Bag by Gaye FowlerCraft Council of British Columbia

Gaye Fowler

Gaye Fowler was born in Winnipeg Manitoba, and is of Jewish and Cree Metis ancestry. At an early age, her family moved to Toronto where she lived until she moved to Vancouver in the mid 70s. 

Raventail Leggins (Lightning Pattern), Gaye Fowler, From the collection of: Craft Council of British Columbia
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Raventail Leggins (Basketweave Pattern), Gaye Fowler, From the collection of: Craft Council of British Columbia
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Orange Flower & Fringe Moccasins by Gaye FowlerCraft Council of British Columbia

Her interest in needle arts developed after graduating from the Fashion Arts Program at Kwantlen. She currently works at Emily Carr University and through the support of the Aboriginal Gathering Place, has developed a deeper interest in working with native materials and processes.

Beaver and Seal Cuffs by Gaye FowlerCraft Council of British Columbia

What Becomes of the Broken Hearted by Brenda CrabtreeCraft Council of British Columbia

Brenda Crabtree

Brenda Crabtree is the Director, Aboriginal Programs at Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver. She is a member of the Spuzzum Band and has both Nlaka'pamux and Sto:lo ancestry. Her art practice includes cedar and spruce root basketry, drum making, moose hair tufting, and beadwork.

Farmed and Dangerous #1 by Brenda CrabtreeCraft Council of British Columbia

Farmed and Dangerous

The sanginous drums represent salmon eggs and the fish skeletons represent the death of our wild salmon. Deadly diseases and residual waste contaminants from BC salmon farms cause environmental damage, human health consequences, and are infecting our wild salmon stocks. Antibiotics, pesticides, even toxic copper sulphate is sometimes used to keep the nets free of algae; all contributing to salmon suffering.

Redskin by Brenda CrabtreeCraft Council of British Columbia

Redskin

"Redskin is pushing the traditional boundaries of deer hide drums by creating tension through text and inviting dialogue as a result of that tension"

Untitled, Brenda Crabtree, From the collection of: Craft Council of British Columbia
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Untitled, Brenda Crabtree, From the collection of: Craft Council of British Columbia
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Crow (Container), Brenda Crabtree, From the collection of: Craft Council of British Columbia
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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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