National Inventors Hall of Fame Class of 2017

Every National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductee has benefited humanity with innovative ideas and groundbreaking work. We applaud their life-changing achievements and honor their diverse stories of inspiration and dedication. Click through to learn more about the inventions and discoveries of our Class of 2017.

Iver Anderson's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Iver Anderson, a metallurgist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory and professor at Iowa State University, focuses his research on powder metallurgy, rapid solidification, and joining problems. He led the team that invented a lead-free solder alloy that has been adopted throughout industry and is now found in most consumer electronics.

Iver Anderson's Bio

Lead-Free Solder_2017 Inductee Exhibit by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Don Arney's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Inventor Don Arney created the Bambi Bucket® in the early 1980s. Although using helicopters and large containers or buckets to fight fires was not new, the Bambi Bucket introduced an efficient collapsible bucket fully controllable by the pilot, offering improved water delivery to a targeted area of the fire.

Don Arney's Bio

Bambi Bucket_Patent DrawingNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Bambi Bucket_2017 Inductee Exhibit by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Carolyn Bertozzi's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Carolyn Bertozzi is recognized as the inventor responsible for a field called bioorthogonal chemistry, which allows researchers to chemically modify molecules within living systems. Bertozzi coined the term in 2003 to describe reactions that do not interfere with cells’ biology.

Carolyn Bertozzi's Bio

Bertozzi Museum Display_2017 Inductee Exhibit by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Eli Harari's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Eli Harari is the inventor of the Floating Gate EEPROM and co-inventor of System-Flash. His work served as the foundation for transforming flash memory into a highly versatile portable mass- storage media, and led to the development and commercialization of the compact, low-cost flash memory that is found today in the vast majority of portable electronic devices. Harari founded SanDisk and served as its CEO for 22 years until his retirement in 2010.

Eli Harari's Bio

Flash Memory_2017 Inductee Exhibit by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Marshall Jones's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Marshall Jones, a mechanical engineer at General Electric (GE), pioneered the use of lasers for industrial materials processing, particularly in the welding, drilling, and cutting of metals at a time when lasers were uncommon in materials processing. He invented novel methods to weld dissimilar metals, and developed fiber optic systems that made lasers much more convenient for industrial applications.

Marshall Jones' Bio

Laser_Patent DrawingNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Laser Head_2017 Inductee Exhibit by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Tom Leighton's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

In the late 1990s, MIT mathematics professor Dr. Tom Leighton and his graduate student Danny Lewin (pictured on next slide) recognized that a solution to freeing up web congestion could be found using applied mathematics and algorithms. Leighton and Lewin invented the methods needed to intelligently replicate and deliver content over a large network of distributed servers, technology that would ultimately solve what was becoming a frustrating problem for Internet users known as the “World Wide Wait.” Almost 20 years later, their innovations, and the company they founded, Akamai, still lead the field.

Tom Leighton's Bio

Danny Lewin Portrait by AkamaiNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

As Akamai's Chief Technology Officer, Lewin was known for his brilliance. He published and presented several breakthrough papers at top computer science conferences and received several awards.

Lewin was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 11 that was hijacked and crashed into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. At the time of his death, he was a Ph.D. candidate at MIT. Lewin earned a B.S. in Computer Science and Mathematics at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. He is named on 25 U.S. patents.

Danny Lewin's Bio

Akamai Control RoomNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Frances Ligler's NIHF Induction by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

Frances Ligler is recognized for her innovative application of emerging technologies in a variety of fields to make optical biosensors smaller, more versatile, and more sophisticated. Thanks to her work conducted at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), biosensors have moved out of the lab and into use for food safety, disease diagnosis, pollution control and homeland security.

Frances Ligler's Bio

Array Biosensor Prototype_2017 Inductee Exhibit by National Inventors Hall of FameNational Inventors Hall of Fame Museum

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