Portrait of Diego

Frida Kahlo wrote this text for the catalog of the exhibition "Diego Rivera, 50 Years of Artistic Work," held at the Palace of Fine Arts in Mexico City in 1949.

By Museo Dolores Olmedo

Self-portrait with Broad-Brimmed Hat (1907) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

I love Diego in such a way that I cannot be a "spectator" in his life, but part of it, so—perhaps—I will exaggerate the positive of his unique personality, trying to dispel the things that, even slightly, might hurt him.

Self-portrait (1930) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

Seeing him naked, one thinks immediately of a young frog, standing on its hind legs. His skin is greenish-white, like that of an aquatic animal. 

Self-portrait (1954) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

His appearance:

With an Asiatic head from which dark hair grows, so thin and fine that it appears to float in the air, Diego is an overgrown boy, huge, with a friendly face and a slightly sad gaze...

Normandy Landscape (1918) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

His character:

Diego is on the margin of all precise and limited personal relationships... He lives within himself, like a seed treasured by the earth, and outwardly, like landscapes.

Sunset number 11 (1956) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

Some people probably expect me to paint very personal portrait of Diego, which is "feminine," anecdotal, funny, full of complaints, and even a certain amount of gossip.

Women Combing Their Hair (1957) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

No words could describe Diego's immense tenderness for things of beauty; his affection for the people who do not have anything to do with the current class structure; or his respect for those who are oppressed by it.

The Rural Schoolteacher (1932) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

He has an especial adoration for the Indians, to whom he links his blood.

Sunset number 13 (1956) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo

Of extraordinarily good taste, he admires and appreciates everything of beauty, whether it vibrates within a woman or a mountain.

The Watermelons (1957) by Diego RiveraMuseo Dolores Olmedo



He rises up with surprising strength and, like no other plant, blooms and bears fruit.

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