Harlem reniassance

By: Matthew Adams

Henry Ossawa Tanner was an African-American artist. He was the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim.
James Mercer Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form called jazz poetry.
Hansel Mieth was a German photojournalist who worked on the staff of LIFE Magazine. She was known for her social commentary photography which recorded the lives of working class Americans in the 1930s
Bernard Hoffman was an American photographer and documentary photographer. The bulk of his photographic journalism was done during the first 18 years of the revamped Life magazine, starting in 1936.
Hans Wild was a photographer for LIFE magazine. This photograph portrays the poverty that the Harlem Renaissance lived through.
Aaron Douglas was an African-American painter and a major figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Born on May 26th, 1898 in Topeka Kansas and died February 3rd 1979.
Here this is a portrait of Aaron Douglas, painted by Edward Harleston. Edwin was a civil rights leader, but always truly felt as a painter.
William Henry Johnson was an African-American painter born in Florence, South Carolina. He became a student at the National Academy of Design in New York.
Another painting by William H. Johnson, this portrays that the people of the Harlem Renaissance did normal things that the white people did, such as sitting in a cafe having lunch.
Henry Ossawa Tanner was an African-American artist. He was the first African-American painter to gain international acclaim. He moved to Paris in 1891 to study, and decided to stay there, being readily accepted in French artistic circles.
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