Life During The great depression

Jacob Williams

The Tennessee Valley Authority provided navigation, flood control, electricity generation, fertilizer manufacturing, and economic development in the Tennessee Valley during the Great Depression. TVA helped many states throughout the Great Depression.
The New Deal was a series of domestic programs enacted in the United States . They included laws passed in Congress and Presidential executive orders. Aimed to restore some measure of dignity and prosperity to many Americans.
Hoover Dam by Dmitri Kessel LIFE Photo Collection Because of the major drought during the Great Depression, it was easier to start the construction of the Hoover Dam. The drought aloud for the workers to start pouring cement because there was not a lot of water in the way.
The Civilian Conservation Corps was created to help provide jobs to young men between 17 and 28 years old. This helped them with clothing, shelter, and food, and also gave them $30 a month for work. This was created because of the New Deal.
Bonus Army. This was an assemblage of 43,000 marchers and 17,000 World War 1 veterans. They demanded cash payments of their service certificates it was known as the Bonus Expeditionary Force. This was led by Walter Waters former army sergeant.
Bonus Army. This was an assemblage of 43,000 marchers and 17,000 World War 1 veterans. They demanded cash payments of their service certificates it was known as the Bonus Expeditionary Force. This was led by Walter Waters former army sergeant.
John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. was an American author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, commonly known by his initials FDR, was an American statesman and political leader who served as the 32nd President of the United States. A Democrat, he won a record four elections and served from March 1933 to his death in April 1945.
Herbert Clark Hoover was the 31st President of the United States. He was a professional mining engineer and was raised as a Quaker. A Republican, Hoover served as head of the U.S. Food Administration during World War I, and became internationally known for humanitarian relief efforts in war-time Belgium
Dorothea Lange was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration.
The dust bowl was an agricultural, economic, and social disaster. It occurred on the great plains of the U.S. during the 1930's. Poor farming practices, and severe drought with high winds devastates farm lands.
A Hooverville was a shanty town built by homeless people during the Great Depression. They were named after Herbert Hoover, who was President of the United States during the Depression and widely blamed for it. He really didn't do it though.
A hobo is someone who moves place to place without a permanent home and doesn't have a job. The number of hobos during the depression was very high and the number kept climbing. The hobos mainly moved by the use of train cars.
Soup kitchens were places where people served the hungry. Soup kitchens were made by people from private churches and later on the government had started to operate them. Families that struggled to put food on the table would most likely go to the soup kitchen for their regular meals at all times in the day. Because of how many unfortunate people their were during the great depression many more soup kitchens were to be opened.
Florence Owens Thompson, born Florence Leona Christie, was the subject of Dorothea Lange's famous photo Migrant Mother, an iconic image of the Great Depression. The Library of Congress titled the image: "Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age thirty-two. Nipomo, California."
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