Renaissance Texture

Uses of texture to convey a sense of what the materials would feel like during the Renaissance Period. Examples of different types of cloth, hair, fur, and metals.

Edward VI as a Child, Hans Holbein the Younger, probably 1538, From the collection of: National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
You get the feeling that the sleeves have ridges to them that lend to the shimmer of the cloth.
Portrait of Isabella of Portugal, Rogier van der Weyden, about 1450, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The veil she wears as part of her headdress appears as if it would feel weightless and airy. Additionally, her sleeves look as if you could feel the raised sections of her robe.
A Young Woman and Her Little Boy, Agnolo Bronzino, c. 1540, From the collection of: National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
Looking at her sleeves, you could get a sense of how ruffly the poofs would feel.
Portrait of a Man, Francesco Salviati, about 1544–1548, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The material of the man's clothing has the sense that it would feel smooth and soft, like satin.
Jacopo Strada, Tiziano Vecellio, called Titian, 1567/1568, From the collection of: Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien
You almost get the feeling that you could run your hands through the fur of the man's cloak.
The white parts of her gown have patterned ridges in it., as well as the gold embroidery. With the detail of this piece in particular, you almost already know what the clothes would feel like.
The Archangel Michael, Francisco de Zurbarán and Studio, 1598 - 1664, From the collection of: Fundación Banco Santander
The texture applied to the metal of his shield and armor give a sense of the hardness of the material.
Jane Seymour, Queen of England, Hans Holbein the Younger, 1536, From the collection of: Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien
The main body of her gown looks as though it would be soft to the touch, yet rigid at the same time.
Portrait of a Man in Armor, Antonis Mor van Dashorst, 1558, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
This suit of armor looks like it is very clean and polished the way it seems as if light is glinting off it.
Sir Thomas More, Hans Holbein, 1527, From the collection of: The Frick Collection
This piece is particularly striking in the effect of textures have on his clothing. The fur and sleeves feel like they are waiting to be touched.
Judith with the Head of Holofernes, Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1520/1540, From the collection of: Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien
The beheaded man's beard is the most prominent feature of texture in this piece. Morbid it may be, but you feel like you can run your fingers through his beard.
Portrait of Alfonso d'Avalos, Marquis of Vasto, in Armor with a Page, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio), probably January-February 1533, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The textures of the armor of this man seem as if light is glinting off of it. You also get a feeling to where the edges of the pieces of armor are.
Portrait of a Young Man, Moretto da Brescia, about 1540-5, From the collection of: The National Gallery, London
The fur of this man's cape looks as if it is soft and warm. The feather in his hat also looks as if it would move if the wind blew. 
Cosimo I de' Medici in armour, Agnolo Bronzino, circa 1545, From the collection of: Art Gallery of New South Wales
The ornamental details of this man's armor give the feeling that they are raised and you can run your fingers along them.
Portrait of a Man, Italian, 16th century, From the collection of: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
This is a particularly effective use of texture on this man's armor. The light glinting off of his armor is noticeably realistic looking and even reflects the man's face upon his shoulder.
Portrait of a Lady ('La Dama in Rosso'), Giovanni Battista Moroni, about 1556-60, From the collection of: The National Gallery, London
This woman's gown gives the sense that it is a very soft and smooth material.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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