THE DIVINE FEMININE

By Emily Vandewalker. In this gallery you will see a compilation of the Female Nude and the differences between them. For each piece, we will delve into what makes it so unique, and thus what creates the Divine Feminine. The Female Nude is appreciated in all time periods, and expressed in all mediums, but the medium and time periods I will be sharing are pieced painted in the 1500s(Late Renaissance)  and the 1800s(Primarily Romanticism & Realism).

In this piece by Gustave Courbet, we can see that he put emphasis on the curves of line in this painting. As it is titled, Nude Woman with a Dog, that is exactly what we see. Courbet focuses on the contours of the woman, all the while using texture to create the fur of the dog. The proportion of this piece is excellent as well. The artist obviously wanted to create a soothing energy with a hint of playfulness by adding the small dog in. In a way it resembles the divine feminine energy while it is innocent all the same.
In this painting of 'Venus and Amor' by Hans Baldung Grien, I can be taken back by how confident Venus looks. Her face is calm, but strong. Amor appears to be wearing a blindfold while tugging on Venus' robes, and she seems unbothered by his presence. It is normal in The Female Nude to see the pattern of artists using line to accentuate the female figure and use texture in surrounding objects such as her robes to play off the smoothness of skin.
This painting depicts a girl defending herself against Eros, the god of love. Most of the 1800's artwork were shrouded in Romanticism. We can see that William Adolphe Bouguereau uses beautiful brushstrokes to bring this piece to life with an excellent flow. Every aspect of this painting seems to smoothly flow together, telling a story. There is a great use of textures, as well as proportions.
Speaking of the 1800's Romanticism, in this painting titled 'Night', Will Adolphe Bougereau once again takes my breath away with his attention to detail. In this painting, the Divine Feminine can not be more clear. The woman is so powerful and elegant, and there is a clear emphasis on her, but also on the bird flying close to her. The unity of this piece is undeniable. Texture of the ocean meeting the sand, and the earth to the sky, make this painting relaxing and calm.
The 1500's were a time of Renaissance. Mythological creatures and scenes of them interacting with humans were a fantasy created to escape in. In the painting 'Mythological Scene' by Dosso Dossi, we are absolutely lost in the focal point of the female nude over most other objects in this piece. The painting has clear movement, proportion, textures, and the use of horizontal lines and space. The color intensity in this are also very beautiful. Dossi clearly put a lot of passion into this.
The painting titled 'Nymph and Shepherd' by Tiziano Vecellio is a wonderful example of the use of space and above all, texture. I point out the texture in this piece because we can see each brush stroke right down to the beautiful woman's skin. The Shepherd can be seen drawn into the beauty of the Nymph, as she almost belongs in the landscape that she is beautifying. She is clearly separated into a Divine Feminine energy, with very masculine attributes all around her.
'Sleeping Nude' by Gustave Courbet can almost be considered an early transition between Romanticism to Realism, which was primarily in the late 1800's. Although it can be considered Romanticism because the woman is depicted beautifully in her Divine Feminine energy, but the realism of this piece is loud and clear, catching the woman sleeping. The emphasis on the female nude over the dark undertones of the background around her brighten this piece up and show us a good use of color value.
In the painting 'Olympia' by Edouard Manet, We can clearly see the 1800's transition to Realism. We see a girl laying in her bed, with a short day heel on her feet. She is wearing a choker, calmly looking at the artist, possibly for a portrait. There is also the appearance of another woman, holding a bouquet of flowers. Not only is this piece showing great color contrast, there are so many textures to look at, therefor creating a variety in the artwork.
'Woman with a Parrot' by Gustave Courbet is another great work by the artist showing the transition between Romanticism to Realism, which was primarily in the late 1800's. Although it can be considered Romanticism because the woman is depicted beautifully in her Divine Feminine energy, the piece is a very natural depiction of a woman lying in her bed, with a pet Parrot. She is calm, beautiful, and soothing to look at. The texture of her hair falling all over the bed around her is a great focal point. The emphasis on the female nude over the dark undertones of the background around her brighten this piece up and show us a good use of color value.
In the painting 'At the Seaside' by Louis-Joseph-Raphael, we can definitely say that the Realism is clear. We see a group of woman carelessly dancing in a circle holding hands on the beach. The sea looks calm behind them, and the light intensity of this painting is remarkable. The artist was probably trying to capture once again the Divine Feminine energy by using light colors and smooth transition in focal points. This painting has great movement, proportion, all the while keeping the focus on the beautiful female nude. Although the painting shows so much happiness and joy, it can be considered calming and humble as well.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Translate with Google
Home
Explore
Nearby
Profile