Contrast in mythology - Nicholas briggs

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

Showing contrast in both representation and color choices in paintings, sculptures and other forms of art. This gallery is going to range from showing the "light" and "dark" aspects of mythology to the simple term of using colors in art forms to show that with the use of bright and dull colors.

The birth of Venus, Sandro Botticelli, 1483 - 1485, From the collection of: Uffizi Gallery
This image, depicting the birth of the goddess Venus, shows a lot of contrast; both through the use of bright color to depict light heartedness and buy using a dark background to draw your eyes to the subject matter.
Storage Jar with Achilles and Ajax Gaming, about 510 B.C., From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The ancient pottery displays scenes using a very dark paint to ensure that the image is sustained for a long time. Also by using a dark paint, it ensures the image is clearly recognizable from a distance.
The Battle of the Sea Gods (the Left Half), Andrea Mantegna, ca. 1475, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
"The Battle of the Sea Gods" uses highly contrasting black and white. Through using only black in this painting, colors are represented with shading and outlining.
The Fall of Ixion, Cornelis Cornelisz. van Haarlem, circa 1588, From the collection of: Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen
The image portraying the fall of Ixion to death or the underworld, uses contrasting light skin vs. the dark descent into the underworld as a soliloquy of the resent demise of Ixion.
Jupiter and Io, Antonio Allegri, called Correggio, 1520/1540, From the collection of: Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien
When Lo fled from Jupiter, he summoned dark clouds to hide his desires from his jealous wife Juno. The dark clouds used as a contrast against Lo's light skin.
Venus, Mars and Cupid, Rubens, Sir Peter Paul, Early to mid-1630s, From the collection of: Dulwich Picture Gallery
This image shows contrast throughout but in particle detail in the bodies. The artist felt that painters should resemble sculptures and did this with the shadows of the creases on the body.
The Offering to Pan, Beauvais Manufactory, Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer, Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer, Guy-Louis Vernansal, 1690–1730, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
The image shows the contrast of the painting though the use of bold, bright colors against the dull, drab background.
The Sacrifice of Iphigenia, Charles de La Fosse, 1680, From the collection of: Palace of Versailles
Iphigenia was to be sacrificed to ensure the safety of Greek ships on the way to Troy. Saved by the goddess of hunting, Diana, the contrasting colors show the good of the rescuer and the bad rest.
Orpheus and Eurydice, Jean Raoux, about 1709, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
Orpheus leading his wife Eurydice from the underworld after winning her freedom with enchanted violin playing. Contrasting the triumphant with light, bright colors and Hades with dark colors.
Pythagoras Emerging from the Underworld, Salvator Rosa, 1662, From the collection of: Kimbell Art Museum
More contrasting light and dark aspects as this image depicts Pythagoras emerging from the underworld.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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