Textures Used to Create Different Materials

Still Life with Ewer, Vessels and Pomegranate, Willem Kalf (Dutch, 1619 - 1693), mid-1640s, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
texture in this painting is used to create different materials on a single piece, such as glass, cloth and metal.
Pistol, Ham, Myung Su, 2008, From the collection of: Korean Art Museum Association
The artist painted something that resembles wool and arranged in a way that it created a gun, painting an object with a different texture than it is in the real world.
The Fertile Crescent, Anselm Kiefer, 2009, From the collection of: Essl Museum - Contemporary Art
in this painting, the brushstrokes used to create bricks seem to pop out, which I thought was really interesting.
High Water, Efrem Zverkov, 1970 - 1970, From the collection of: The Institute of Russian Realist Art (IRRA)
using different brushstrokes and the reflection from what is above it, the artist created the illusion of water in their painting.
A Maid Milking a Cow in a Barn, Gerard ter Borch (Dutch, 1617 - 1681), about 1652 - 1654, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
using techniques of light and shadow, the artist was able to create many different materials, such fur, clay and wood.
Still Life with Watermelon, Pears, Grapes, Lilly Martin Spencer, ca. 1860, From the collection of: National Museum of Women in the Arts
in this painting, the artist was able to create, in her painting, rock, the inside part of watermelons and other fruits.
The Apostle Simon, Anthony van Dyck (Flemish, 1599 - 1641), about 1618, From the collection of: The J. Paul Getty Museum
using color as well as light and shadow techniques, the artist was able to create hair and cloth.
Boy Blowing Bubbles, Frans van Mieris the Elder, 1663, From the collection of: Kunstpalast
texture in this piece is used to create stone, plants and cloth.
A Room in Schloss Buchwald, Friedrich Wilhelm Klose, 1840–45, From the collection of: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
texture in this piece is used to create many different materials such as cloth, wood and plants.
Snowy Forest, Andreas Achenbach, 1835, From the collection of: Kunstpalast
in this piece, the artist was able to create snow and wood.
Yarra flats, Louis Buvelot, 1871, From the collection of: National Gallery of Victoria
the artist was able to create wood, leaves and clouds using different colors and brushstrokes.
Under the Yoke (Burning the Brushwood), Eero Järnefelt, 1893, From the collection of: Ateneum Art Museum
in this piece, what caught my attention was how the artist was able to create fire and smoke.
Anguish, August Friedrich Albrecht Schenck, 1876/1880, From the collection of: National Gallery of Victoria
in this piece the artist created fur, snow and mist.
Spitz Dog, Thomas Gainsborough RA, 1727–1788, British, ca. 1765, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
using color as well as light and shadow, the artist was able to create fur.
Diamond Snake, Morelia spilotes, Helena Forde, Gerard Krefft, 1869, From the collection of: Museums Victoria
using light and shadow techniques the artist did, in my opinion, an impressive job of creating scales.
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