Historical st. louis, missouri

In Missouri there are many wonderful sights to see, but no matter where you go in Missouri it couldn't be built up without the importing and exporting that ran off of the Mississippi into St. Louis. The World's Fair helped bring in more businesses which made St. Louis even more popular. The photos here are just some of many that show how history was made through Missouri. Welcome to historical St. Louis.

Silver Medal from the Louisiana Purchase was created in 1904 by Adolph A. Weinman. It is an architectural tablet inscribed with "Silver Medal" and "Louisiana Purchase Exposition." There are two dolphins at the bottom of the medal that symbolize the connection of the east and west coast. Flour de Lis are located in each corner. The artist used texture in this art work to make it stand out to show how important the Louisiana Purchase really was.
Levee, St. Louis, Missouri is a beautiful photograph of the the St. Louis river front in 1867. Alexander Gardner captured the photograph. The photograph uses spatial perspective. It captures how industrial the Mississippi River was with steamboats. All the cobblestone by the water front is still there today.
The Photograph from the Louisiana Purchase is of the Mississippi State Building. The Mississippi State Building attracted travelers to come in and have tea as a symbol of southern hospitality. The Mississippi State building is a replica of the home of the confederate president Jefferson Davis. The photograph was captured in the early 1900's by Samuel Cupples Envelope Co. The museum where this photograph is displayed is Ohr-O'Keefe Museum of Art.
The Levee from Eads Bridge, St. Louis was by Joseph Pennell in 1919 is a wonderful drawing every day life in Downtown St. Louis, Missouri. From the industrial import and export of goods using the river front to different businesses bringing people from miles around. The Eads bridge still stands today and marks as one of St. louis's beautiful architecture.
This is another wonderful drawing of the Eads Bridge from Joseph Pennell capturing it from different angle. The one of it many beauties Is that isn't not just a roadway over the Mississippi River but it hold a railway right under the road going over into Illinois. This drawing is also from 1919.
The Gateway Arch and Wall is a drawing from around 1895 by Santiago Rusinol. The drawing is displayed in Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya - MNAC, Barcelona. Santiago Rusinol uses texture in the drawing to show how it looks like you are going into the opening.
The City Bridge, St. Louis is an etching by Joseph Pennell from 1919. The City Bridge, St. Louis is displayed at the National Gallery of Art, Washington DC. This is a a picture of the Eads Bridge. Pennell shows the use of the railway under the road going over into Illinois.
The Office of the Union Pacific Railroad Company is a photograph captured by Alexander Gardner in 1867. The photograph is of the office for the Union Pacific Railroad Company in St. Louis. This photograph is displayed at The J. Paul Getty Museum.
Depot St. Louis, Missouri is a photograph captured by Alexander Gardner. The photograph was captured in 1867. The photograph shows the people around the Union Pacific train station. The photograph is displayed at The J. Paul Getty Museum.
Newsies at Skeeters Branch, St. Louis Missouri is a photograph captured by Lewis Hine. The photograph was captured in 1910. The photograph is displayed at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The photograph shows how times were different then compared to now. It shows 3 young kids that work for the news paper outside smoking.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Translate with Google
Home
Explore
Nearby
Profile