The Great Depression

Also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the US and Canadian prairies during the 1930s, severe drought and a failure to apply dry land farming methods to prevent wind erosion caused the phenomenon.
A deprived area on the outskirts of a town consisting of large numbers of crude dwellings.
A series of domestic programs enacted in the United States between 1933 and 1938, and a few that came later. They included both laws passed by Congress as well as presidential executive orders during the first term of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
During the Great Depression thousands of unemployed residents who could not pay their rent or mortgages were evicted into the world of public assistance and bread lines.
A place where food is offered to the hungry for free or at a below market price. Frequently located in lower-income neighborhoods, they are often staffed by volunteer organisations, such as church or community groups. Soup kitchens sometimes obtain food from a food bank for free or at a low price, because they are considered a charity, which makes it easier for them to feed the many people who require their services.
The Emergency Banking Act, Public Law 1, 48 Stat. 1, as an act passed by the United States Congress in 1933 in an attempt to stabilize the banking system. Beginning on February 14 of that year, Michigan, which had been hit particularly hard by the Great Depression, declared an eight-day bank holiday.
A homeless person; a tramp or vagrant.
It was the popular name of an assemblage of some 43,000 marchers—17,000 World War I veterans, their families, and affiliated groups.
A public work relief program that operated from 1933 to 1942 in the United States for unemployed, unmarried men from relief families as part of the New Deal.
This was an iconic image of the Great Depression.
Dorothea Lange was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration.
The Tennessee Valley Authority is a federally owned corporation in the United States created by congressional charter in May 1933 to provide navigation, flood control, electricity generation, fertilizer manufacturing, and economic development to the Tennessee Valley, a region particularly affected by the Great Depression.
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