Principle of Motion

Principle of Motion

The repeating lines and flow of the white water in the painting create the sense that it is rushing down the cliff.
This is a kinetic sculpture, which is by definition movement.  
The repeating marks and shapes at the site of impact in this painting show the movement and crash of the house collapse. It looks as if the debris is flying off of the canvas.
This is a stroboscopic motion photograph, which causes the illusion and implication of motion.  Even the the image is not moving, we know by looking at this photograph that the girl is riding the bike.
The people in this painting seem to be fleeing from the same thing, so the eye is directed toward the upper right corner, where we can see where the volcano is most likely erupting causes the statues to crumble and fall.  The artist shows that the are falling by the diagonal plane they are on, suggesting they are teetering and ready to fall.  The flow and drapery of the fabrics that the people are wearing also suggests movement. 
The contrast of the black and white stripes, along with the varying curves of the lines of the shapes and the stripes make an optical illusion.  The techniques used make it appear as though the circles are spinning.
A mobile is another version of a kinetic sculpture. It is literally art in motion.
This is another example of a stroboscopic motion photograph.  It portrays the motion of a girl doing a cartwheel.  
The repeating lines and flow of the flames in this painting make the flames look real and as if they are blowing in the wind. The strokes of the flames are different than the strokes used to paint the static people, which gives the illusion of motion.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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