Urban landscape:  a shade of light by Rachel Betts 

This gallery embraces architectural illustrations found in black and white.  These pieces specifically underline the artistic formal element of value.  In summary, the value in art describes the lightness and/or darkness of a color or tone concerning that image. These range of these values are from light (tint), to grey, to dark (shade). 

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC 1) Residential Buildings (1977) are located in Abu Dhabi. Designers Constantine D. Kapsambelis & Associates built this complex. Photographer Pascal Menoret did this image, which features values, predominantly that of lightness with some grey but also respects contributed to the darkness values as well. The covered parking lot controls the darkness since cannot make its way to those spaces. However, the lightness does appear in great volume in the far left angle of the piece while it joins the greys on the focus in the center, the design itself.
The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC 2) Residential Buildings (1977) are located in Abu Dhabi was built by designers Constantine D. Kapsambelis & Associates. The piece, captured by Photographer Pascal Menoret brings forth the element of value via a specific shooting angle. In doing so, Menoret stresses the dark tones between grey tones throughout the piece, while the light tones serve as the umbrella (sky) to the piece. To the left of the image you can see how the grey tone of the cloud attempts to mask the left side of the design because it too dressed in the grey tone. Still the contrast in these tones made beautiful harmony in company of the dark tones featured in the peaking tree branches.
The Alvorada Palace (circa 1962) is located in Brasilia, Brazil. Photographer Marcel Gautherot used gelatin silver print for this piece. The grey walls behind the light scale of the three points both reflect off an aquatic foundation, which portrays a deeper grey value. The darker value creates a space in the far rear of the piece, which allows us to escape within this image.
The National Congress (circa 1958 under construction) Brasilia, Brazil. Developed and designed by Lucio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer in 1956. Photographer Marcel Gautherot was able to use the angle of shooting this piece so that the light would not only highlighted the subjects but it also created dark shadows behind them. Here we also see lines of darkness between lines of lightness on the design itself. In the far left rear area of the piece, we see the depth of the darkness of this piece, which also spills into the seams of the round edges. Nevertheless, before we reach the darkness, the grey introduces itself in the mid center and hovers over some of the subjects as well.
The National Congress (1960) resides in Brasilia, D.F. Brazil. Developed and designed by Lucio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer in 1956, photographer Marcel Gautherot managed to capture robust levels of value in the light, grey and dark scales because of his shooting angle. The grey tones “sandwiches” the center’s darkness, while the light tones serve as a backdrop to this beauty.
The National Congress (1960) resides in Brasilia, Brazil. Developed and designed by Lucio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer in 1956. Just from changing his shooting position, photographer Marcel Gautherot changes the value in this piece by making darkness the base of this piece while the light tones become the focal point. It then goes on to have the grey tones serve as a spatial backdrop that allows us to join the illusion of seeing beyond the image.
The National Congress (1960) resides in Brasilia, Brazil. Developed and designed by Lucio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer in 1956. Playing with the atmosphere light, photographer Marcel Gautherot brings us the most breathtaking dark tone silhouette with a peaking ray of light that gives us the idea of where the main light source is position. The grey tones serve as a backdrop with even darker grey tones hovering above.
The National Congress (1960) resides in Brasilia, Brazil. Developed and designed by Lucio Costa and Oscar Niemeyer in 1956. Photographer Marcel Gautherot captures a family of grey tones in this piece in the two columns, the sky as well as the basin. In contrast to that, we find the light tones in the clouds as well as the deck foundation. Even with these two tones consuming most of the value elements, we still find a small portion of dark tones serving as the shadow of the deck’s lower frame edge.
Cathedral Metropolitana Nossa Senhora Aparecida (circa 1960) of Brasilia, DF Brazil. Photographed by Marcel Gauthernot, this piece uses the shadow reflections of the beams to create the dark tones, while the beams themselves host the grey tones. Still we find some lighter tones as well residing within the clouds. If you look closer to the upper level of the design, you will also reveal subtle dark tones creeping through the cracks of the grey tone beam points.
ADG Al-lbrahimi (2014) of Abu Dhabi done by Layo Olayiwola. This “braid” of shades focuses more on the darkness of the element of value while framed by the lightness of the tones. Grey tones do not really appear in this piece but when the outside shadow meets the lower right area of the design, it involuntarily reveals a subtle darker grey shade of the values; some may even identify it as a lighter dark tone.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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