Propaganda: The Art of War - Mary Rowden

This gallery explores the art of propaganda during World War Two, in which patriotism became the central theme of advertising throughout the war, as large scale campaigns were launched to sell war bonds, promote efficiency in factories, reduce ugly rumors, and maintain civilian morale. Propaganda was and still is today a form of biased based communication aimed at promoting or demoting certain views, perceptions or agendas.

Bernard Perlin’s “Let’em Have It Buy Extra Bonds” war bonds poster was used by the United States of America during World War Two to help encourage people to buy war bonds. The movement in the poster depicts a heroic soldier on the front lines about to throw a grenade into enemy territory. The artist used line, shape, and form to help strengthen the overall composition and movement of the piece.
Robert S. Sloan’s “Doing All You Can, Brother? Buy War Bonds” poster was used by the United States of America during World War Two to help encourage people to buy war bonds. The color in the poster helps depicts a close-up of a soldier with a bandaged head and a blood-stained uniform. The artist used proportion and scale to help create a 3D sense of illusion.
Morgan Douglas’ “Work On a Farm… This Summer. Join The U.S. Crop Corps” poster encouraging citizens to work on a farm during the summer months to help ease the ongoing farm labor shortage during World War Two. The artist used color in the poster to help depict a healthy looking couple dressed in farming overalls, a man carrying a pitch fork, and woman carrying vegetables. Along with balance to create a visual rightness that helps enhance the overall content.
C. R. Miller’s “Having These Now or Winning the War… Which Means More to You?” poster encouraging citizens to stop using oil, coffee, canned goods, meat, and gas; during World War Two because there was a shortage of those products on the war front. The artist used simplicity and harmony in the poster to help depict the soldiers on the war front and the items that they are in desperate need of.
“Women in The War, We Can’t Win Without Them” poster by an unknown artist. During World War Two, many women found jobs that were previously unavailable to them now available. Many of these jobs paid higher wages, than those traditionally categorized as "women's work". With fewer men in competition for these positions, the number of employed women grew. The artist used color and shape in the poster to help create a positive/ negative shape that is exciting and catching for the viewer to look at.
Walter Richards’ “They’ve Got More Important Places To Go Then You!... Save Rubber Check Your Tires Now” poster was used by the United States of America during World War Two to reflected and remind Americans about the shortage of natural rubber for tires. The movement in the poster depicts a jeep full of soldiers traveling at a high speed trying to get somewhere because they have places to be. The artist used line, shape, and form to help strengthen the overall composition and movement of the piece.
Sarra’s “I’ll Carry Mine Too!” poster was used by the United States of America during World War Two to reflected and help remind Americans about the shortage of trucks and tires. The artist used color and texture to help strengthen the overall composition of the piece by bringing to the views attention that the woman is clearly holding here own groceries.
Henry Koerner’s “Save Waste Fats For Explosives. Take Them to Your Meat Dealer” poster was used by the United States of America during World War Two to remind Americans that cooking fats are a vile ingredient in making explosions. The poster shows a woman's hand pouring waste oil from a skillet, which turns into an exploding flame of group bombs. The artist used overlapping, leading lines, and repetitive shapes to help harmonize the image.
Henry Koerner’s “United We Are Strong. United We Will Win.” poster was used to remind Americans of the united Allied forces for victory was strong. This poster of weapon barrels firing in unison with the the allied countries flags helps demonstrates the message of the poster: that united we are strong. The artist used overlapping, leading lines, and repetitive shapes to help harmonize the image and he used line, shape, and form to help strengthen his overall composition causing an overall balance to displays a visual rightness to his piece.
“Food Is a Weapon. Don’t Waste It!” poster by an unknown artist was used to encouraging American families to conserve food during World War Two, because the government was buying large quantities of food to feed the troops and fewer men were available to farm and grow crops; which caused a shortage in the food supply. The artist used contrast and value to help emphasize the clean plate in the poster to help farther back up his/her point of not wasting food.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
Translate with Google
Home
Explore
Nearby
Profile