JAPAN:THE NATURAL WORLD -LANDSCAPES

Japanese art can come in a wide variety of genres and styles. The Japanese landscape art exhibit Chinese and Western influence. Landscape painting or Landscape art    is the depiction in art of landscapes, where we will see natural scenery of mountains, valleys, rivers, trees and forests.      The first two paintings is part of a four painting series of the seasons. One of them depicts the Fall season and the other one depicts the Winter season. Both paintings were painted in the Muromachi period.   The third painting is another landscape painting that has the use of vibrant colors. This particular painting was made in the Edo period.  The last two pieces are furniture pieces, a chest and cabinet. The chest is made by a artist that is unknown and the cabinet is made by a french artist.        Each and every piece depicts the Japanese landscapes through different mediums. Each piece follows the format of incorporating the natural scenery of Japans landscape. You'll see the mountains, trees, valleys and forests in each of the Japanese landscape pieces.  1."Landscape of the Four Seasons, Fall - EKokuhou." Landscape of the Four Seasons, Autumn - EKokuhou. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.        2."Landscape of the Four Seasons, Winter - EKokuhou." Landscape of the Four Seasons, Autumn - EKokuhou. N.p., n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016. 3."Victoria and Albert Museum." , Digital Media Webmaster@vam.ac.uk. Victoria and Albert Museum, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.          4."Kameido Tenjin Keidai 亀戸天神境内 (Wistaria at Kameido Tenjin Shrine) / Meisho Edo Hyakkei 名所江戸百景 (One Hundred Famous Views in Edo, No. 57)." British Museum. British Museum, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016.         5. "Cabinet (Getty Museum)." The J. Paul Getty in Los Angeles. Getty Museum, n.d. Web. 25 Apr. 2016

Landscapes of Four Seasons: Fall is painted by Sesshū Toyo and is part of a four series set of paintings. Painted on silk, during the Muromachi period, Its size, material, motifs, and style are each explicitly Chinese because Sesshū Toyo painted this in China and was influenced by the Chinese art. We can see that the landscapes of the four seasons were an important repertoire for Sesshū from the fact that there were other landscapes of the four seasons that were (fan-shaped).
Landscapes of Four Seasons: Winter is painted by Sesshū Toyo and is part of a four series set of paintings. Painted on silk, during the Muromachi period, Its size, material, motifs, and style are each explicitly Chinese because Sesshū Toyo painted this in China and was influenced by the Chinese art. We can see that the landscapes of the four seasons were an important repertoire for Sesshū from the fact that there were other landscapes of the four seasons that were (fan-shaped).
Made in the Edo period by Utagawa Hiroshige, is a color woodblock print. View through hanging wisteria flowers: drum bridge spanning lake; people crossing bridge; three sparrows flying. Inscribed, signed, sealed and marked. The artist Hiroshige was influenced by another Japanese artist named, Hokusai. Hiroshige paintings evoked seasonal moods with association of literature and artistic tradition.
The Mazarin Chest, is renowned as one of the finest pieces of Japanese export lacquer to have survived from the second quarter of the seventeenth century, it's a internationally acclaimed collection of Japanese art. It is made of black-lacquered wood lavishly decorated with landscape scenes incorporating subject matter from the Tale of Genji and the Tale of the Soga Brothers.
Made during the Edo period, a French arist by the name of Joseph Baumhauer created this cabinet with japanese influence. The combination of rare and expensive materials used on this cabinet indicates that it was a particularly expensive commission. There are four Japanese lacquer panels that date from the mid- to late 1600s and were created with a technique known as kijimaki-e. For this type of lacquer, artisans sanded plain wood to heighten its strong grain and used it as the background of each panel. They then added the scenic elements of landscape, plants, and animals in raised lacquer. Although this technique was common in Japan, such large panels were rarely incorporated into French eighteenth-century furniture. Heavy Ionic pilasters, whose copper-filled flutes give an added rich color and contrast to the gilt-bronze mounts, flank the panels. Yellow jasper, a semiprecious stone, rather than the usual marble, forms the top.
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