Emotions in Freud's Works and Antigone

"Emotion in Sophocles' Antigone and Sigmund Freud's Introductory Lectures on Psychoanalysis." One of Freud's most prominent theories is the existence of the Id, the subconscious part of the human psyche where basic, primal emotions exist and influence our conscious thoughts and actions. Sophocles’ Antigone is the third and final piece of the Theban Plays, a dramatic depiction of a girl’s emotional attempts to bury her disgraced brother. Antigone is driven to action by her emotions, the wild and raging grief for her brother overruling the cautious logic and obedience for the law that is expected of her. The dominance of powerful emotional drives is a concept explored by Sigmund Freud in his study of the Id, linking his work with Sophocles’ classic piece of literature.

The painting depicts a girl in a state of deep sorrow, capturing the emotions of Antigone as she mourned for the death of her brother and the calamities that have befallen her family.
This painting shows a storm at sea, a violent and chaotic mix of Nature’s elements (Strindberg) that stands as another representation of Antigone’s powerful, swirling feelings of grief and sorrow.
John Brown took matters into his own hands and did what he thought was right to protest American slavery, willing to face death to do so (Hovenden), acting just as Antigone had for her brother.
This ancient scale serves as a symbol of Freud’s theories, the balance between the unconscious urges of the Id and rationality of the superego.
Faust yielding to the temptation of the devil is symbolic of Antigone yielding to her grief over logic, her Id dominating her superego.
Antigone places her faith in the Gods, specifically Zeus, superseding the authority of her uncle. Again, the emotional and spiritual (the Id) take precedence over the logical and structured.
This embracing family is symbolic of Antigone’s unbreakable devotion to her family and love for her brother, concepts which Freud explores extensively in his study of the Id.
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