The Power of Symmetry for Balance

This gallery contains images that use symmetry and asymmetry to achieve a type of balance and to draw your attention to a certain area.

The Miraculous Draft of Fishes, Raphael, c.1515 - c.1516, From the collection of: Royal Collection Trust, UK
This image is asymmetrical but has balance due to the motion happening on both sides
Interior at Night, Nadel, Arno, 20th century, From the collection of: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History
This image is asymmetrical in order to attract your attention to a specific area in the image.
Woman Praying, Nadel, Arno, 20th century, From the collection of: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History
The use of asymmetry int his image is to drwe your attention to the woman praying.
The Piano Lesson, Frances Hodgkins, c 1909, From the collection of: Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki
As much motion that is going on in this image, it helps to guide your eyes smoothly across the piece, thus having symmetry and a proper balance. 
Venus and Satyr, Sebastiano Ricci, ca. 1716–1720, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest
This piece has symmetry, not for having the same thing going on in both sides, but for the fact of having the same amount of motion and objects on both sides. 
Sappers at Work : Canadian Tunnelling Company, R14, St Eloi, Bomberg, David, 1918 - 1919, From the collection of: Imperial War Museums
The motion in this image allows some symmetry to happen, though it also asymmetrical, but helps guides the viewer's eyes across the image.
Fire's on, Arthur Streeton, 1891, From the collection of: Art Gallery of New South Wales
This piece is very symmetrical for being similar on both sides of the image, creating a nice balance for the viewer.
Midsummer Eve bonfire on Skagen's beach, P.S. Krøyer, 1906, From the collection of: Skagens Museum
This piece is also symmetrical, consisting of enough movement going around in the image that leads you to the center, the bonfire.
Under the Yoke (Burning the Brushwood), Eero Järnefelt, 1893, From the collection of: Ateneum Art Museum
The symmetry in this piece is balanced out with what is going on in both sides of the image.
Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette, Auguste Renoir, 1876, From the collection of: Musée d’Orsay, Paris
This image contains a lot of motion, which gives symmetry because if the image is split in half, there is enough balance on both sides for the viewer to move across.
St. Francis in the Desert, Giovanni Bellini, Around 1480, From the collection of: The Frick Collection
This image is asymmetrical because of the in balance of the image, allows the main focal point to be the monk.
Sunrise, Inverness Copse, Nash, Paul, 1918, From the collection of: Imperial War Museums
This piece is asymetrical but still draws your attention to the trees and the moon.
Wire, Nash, Paul, 1918, From the collection of: Imperial War Museums
This image consists of asymmetry, and draws more attention to one side of the piece with the most motion.
A wet day on a wild coast, William Mathew Hodgkins, 1894, From the collection of: Te Papa
This image has a bit of asymmetrical symmetry, since there is more going on in one side of the image than the other.
The General of an Armoured Division sitting beside his Tank, Ardizzone, Edward Jeffrey Irving (CBE, RA), 1942, From the collection of: Imperial War Museums
This image consists of a balanced symmetry, which is due to the fact of the tank in the background, being used to balance out the image.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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