"For the fairest one": an act that destroyed all- (Kimberly Cooper)

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This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.

This gallery is a collection of paintings and artworks of The Judgement of Paris. It is a representation of the accounts that took place before the fall of Troy. Started with a party and a golden apple that Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite all thought was a gift to them. Paris was the unfortunate soul to be the judge and choose Aphrodite due to the promise of the most beautiful woman by his side. This one decision changed everything. It was this story that made me intrigued by Mythology in the first place.

The Judgement of Paris, van der Werff, Adriaen, 1716, From the collection of: Dulwich Picture Gallery
In this painting, there are six figures. Paris holding the golden apple, then behind him in the shadows is Hermes. Hera, Aphrodite, and Athena are described by their garments. Cupid stands near his mother. The artist does a great job with detail of each person.
The Judgement of Paris, Georg Raphael Donner, ca. 1735, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest
Made with an alloy of tin and lead, this piece stands out on its own. Though it lacks color, it is the amazing details that makes it great. The small little extras give meaning as well, like the temple in the background and the dog near Paris looking upward at the women. Here, Paris is already giving the apple to Aphrodite.
The Judgement of Paris, HENDRICK VAN BALEN I, 1608, From the collection of: Muzeul Național Brukenthal
This piece brings a lot of color in its descriptions of each party. Cupid looks much older here than most of the other paintings and above Aphrodite it appears to be two little angels about to crown her the most fairest.
The Judgement of Paris, Peter Paul Rubens, probably 1632-5, From the collection of: The National Gallery, London
This piece adds a little more story to the epic tale as the goddesses are asked to remove their clothes for Paris. The artist also includes a mirror which a Fury is seen watching the situation. Up in the clouds we see what appears to be the other gods watching as well.
Landscape with the Judgement of Paris, Gillis van Coninxloo, End of the 16th century - early 17th century, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
This piece not only shows the Judgement of Paris but also shows the beautiful landscape behind them. The artist did an amazing job with the colors and blending the scenery together in one painting. It is showing how no one can know what can be going on just behind them.
The Judgement of Paris, circle of John Flaxman, 1755–1826, British, unknown artist, undated, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
This painting was made by an unknown artist but it tells a story just like the rest. Made on a cream paper with graphite, it gives texture to the artwork. The artist gave each character a shadow in a way, showing different actions. For example, it shows Paris moving in to give the apple to Aphrodite as if in slow motion.
The Judgment of Paris, Lucas Cranach the Elder, c. 1512–14, From the collection of: Kimbell Art Museum
The artist here made a different approach to the already famous story. He chose to made Hera, Athena, and Aphrodite look exactly alike with no real details of who is who. This tells that the choice for Paris was hard and all he could do was listen to their proposal of what they could do for him.
The Judgement of Paris, Jacopo Guarana, 1720/1808, From the collection of: National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
This is an etching on plain paper but regardless of the color, its intricate detail is why it is beautiful to look at. Hermes and Cupid are not shown in this piece, focusing only on the four. Each goddess looks alike here as well and Paris is only left with making a decision without obvious beauty standing in the way.
The Judgment of Paris, French 16th Century, 1500/1599, From the collection of: National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
This engraving depicts a somewhat darker side of the story. It is without color but the details are evident. Including the what could appear as an angel in each corner of the piece. It is as if they are cutting a piece of time out to show to everyone.
The Judgment of Paris, Orazio Fontana, 1565/1570, From the collection of: The Frick Collection
The artist here did an amazing job telling a story on a simple plate. The details and the colors are hard to ignore. Here, Paris has already giving the apple to Aphrodite as many of the gods watch on. Each beauty is easily recognized by items that they are known for.
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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