South Korean Theater in Black and White - Stephanie Pizonero

This gallery displays photographs taken between 1962 and 2011 of Korean theater in black and white. The photos show Korean theater throughout the years and thought many different genres. There's everything from Changgeuk, a type of music drama based on pansori (traditional Korean music,) to opera and ballet. 

This is a photograph from a 1962 performance of “Spirit is Alive.” The focal point is the sole actress in the photo. There is a great sense of movement in the photo, and beautiful lines as well. The soft lines and delicate posture give a sense of refinement and poise.
This is a photograph from a 1962 performance of the ballet “Fantasy of White.” It was performed by the National Dance Company of Korea. Even though the photo itself has many impurities, the beauty and uniform shape of the dancers still remains. Their lines are smooth, fitting for a ballet.
This is a photograph from a 1962 performance of “Prince Hodong.” It was performed by the National Opera Company of Korea. The focal point of this photo is the two performers in the center. The blurred image of the actor shows the unexpected movement when the picture was being taken.
This is a photograph from a 1963 performance of “Aerang and Baebijang.” It was performed by the National Changgeuk Company of Korea. By the gestures and leaning shapes of the men, you can interpret that they are talking about the man on the ground, who’s facial expression appears sad and burdened.
This is a photograph from a 1963 performance of “Soliloquy of the Death.” It was performed by the National Dance Company of Korea. The focal point are the two dancers in the middle, their form and proximity showing the intensity of the dance and the close relationship between the characters.
This is a photograph from a 1976 performance of “Coppelia.” It was performed by the National Ballet Company of Korea. Like the previous photo, the focus is the two dancers in the middle of the photograph. Their emphasis can also be noticed by the way they are better lit than the other dancers. This is also beautifully balanced.
This is a photograph from a 1990 performance of “Whangjinie.” It was performed by the National Changgeuk Company of Korea. The sole actress is the focal point of this photo, along with the curtain with an illustration of a middle-aged woman. With the way the actress is positioned and her facial expression of sadness or longing, it can be interpreted that the woman on the curtain was either her younger self, or someone she lost.
This is a photograph from a 2009 performance of the classic, “Romeo and Juliet.” Though this Shakespearian tale was performed with Korean influences, the same feelings of love and loss still come through. You can see that the focus was meant to be on the pair, as nothing else is lit.
This is a photograph from a 2010 performance of "Prince Hodong." This time, it was performed by the Korean National Ballet. This is another photo that shows the close relationship between the two characters by their proximity. Both actors have a strong form, but the actress still has soft lines and a delicate air about her.
This is a photograph from a 2011 performance of “Turandot.” It was performed by the Korea National Opera. The main focus is the actress, her costume and facial expression catching your eye immediately. Even though there is an actor next to her, he is not lit the same as she is, bringing more attention to her painful facial expression.
Credits: All media
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