EDUC 4605

Ducks, Duckling, Ponds

Ducks and Other Birds about a Stream in an Italianate Landscape, Francis Barlow, 1671, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
This painting is rich in textures and in colour. It shows a high degree of ability. The artist attempted to capture the different motions that ducks and birds are capable of achieving.
Bird in Flight, Spier, Joseph, 1900/1978, From the collection of: Leo Baeck Institute, Center for Jewish History
Joseph Spier successfully captured a duck in flight. In its the colour selection, the artist created a rich texture for the painting.
Feeding the Ducklings, Thomas Rowlandson, undated, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
Thomas Rowlandson has created an intricate scene where different characters interact. This is a very interesting piece because of the perspectives and details in the background. This art work plays on the concept of foreground and background.
Duck's Cross, Song, Myung Jin, 송명진, 2008, From the collection of: Korean Art Museum Association
This is a very interesting piece. 'Duck's Cross' uses vibrant colours and abstract thinking to convey and evoke emotion.
Ducks in a Frozen Lake, Kong, Sung Hun, 2009, From the collection of: Korean Art Museum Association
This scene uses cool colours to show a sense of serenity and piece. This painting shows how colour selection can influence the mood or feeling of a painting.
Lotus and Ducks, Artist: Bada Shanren (Zhu Da), Colophon: Colophon by Wu Changshuo ???, ca. 1696, From the collection of: Freer and Sackler Galleries
This painting shows an interesting dichotomy between flowers and ducks. It demonstrates the intricacies of both, while the eye surveys the differences between the images.
Ducks and Lotus Flowers, Kong, Sung Hun, 2008, From the collection of: Korean Art Museum Association
Sung Hun Kong, has used both warm and cool colours to elicit certain responses and guide the eye through the painting. The warm reflection of the sun attracts the initial attention of the viewer, then the eye gradually surveys the rest of the painting.
Pond with Willow Tree and Ducks, Peter DeWint, undated, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
This painting demonstrates how the eye is directed towards the larger objects. The eye is instantly draw to the Willow tree and the details therein. Then as the eyes move throughout the painting, you notice the details and care given to the details of the ducks.
Mandarin ducks, Chao Shao-an, 1968, From the collection of: Hong Kong Heritage Museum
Choa Shao-an has demonstrates effective use of vibrant colours. The coloured accents of the ducks make them almost jump write off the page.
A Macaw, Ducks, Parrots and Other Birds in a Landscape, Jacob Bogdani, between 1708 and 1710, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
This art work demonstrates a marriage between colour and perspective. The objects closer are sharper and more vibrant, and as the eye moves to the background, the images become a bit more distorted and colour is less defined.
Ducklings, John Everett Millais, 1889, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
This piece of art shows how different aspects of a painting can evoke different emotions. The girl looks as though she is stern and not enjoying herself. Yet if you look closely you see that she has bread to feed the ducks. The ducks themselves appear to represent the innocence of the child.
The Ponds of Gylieu, Charles-François Daubigny (French, b.1817, d.1878), 1853, From the collection of: Cincinnati Art Museum
This painting captures the habitat of the ducks. It uses cool colours with warm accents to help heighten the sense of realism.
The Ponds of Gylieu, Charles-François Daubigny (French, b.1817, d.1878), 1853, From the collection of: Cincinnati Art Museum
Credits: All media
This user gallery has been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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