Flowers

A collection of floral paintings, paintined in different ways with different meanings and in unusual scenes.

Mixed flowers on pink cloth, Roderic O'Conor, circa 1916, From the collection of: Te Papa
I chose this flower painting by Roderic O'Conor because it has warm colours and textures included in the painting.
Still-Life with Flowers, Rachel Ruysch, From the collection of: Hallwyl Museum
I chose this painting by Rachel Ruysch because it was different to the other paitnings and included a dark background which made the flowers stand out more and looked like they were slowly dying.
Flowers, Victoria Dubourg (Fantin-Latour), Undated, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
I chose this particular painting because the were big, bright flowers that stood out of their plain background.
Sunflowers, Vincent van Gogh, January 1889 - 1889, From the collection of: Van Gogh Museum
I chose this Sunflower painting by Vincent Van Gogh, because it is very famous and the background and the flowers are the same colour but are still visible to the eye.
Still Life with Flowers and Fruit, Paul Cézanne, around 1890, From the collection of: Alte Nationalgalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
I really liked this painting by Paul Cezanne, because it didn't just include flowers, but also included some other props to tell the story in the picture better.
Sunflower, Chao Shao-an, 1967, From the collection of: Hong Kong Heritage Museum
I really liked this painting by Chao Shao-an, because it is very similar to Jackson Pollock's work, but it still has its own version of what flowers look like.
Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose, John Singer Sargent, Around 1885, From the collection of: Tate Britain
This painting was done by John Singer Sargent and almost looked like a photo, with multi-coloured flowers and a young girl lighting lanterns.
Tulipa gesneriana, Johannes Simon Holtzbecher, 1649-1659, From the collection of: SMK - Statens Museum for Kunst
I chose this painting because it was a simple piece of art work, which included Tulips in a sort of cross section diagram.
Peony Garden, Claude Monet, 1887, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
I loved this painting by Claude Monet because it has bright flowers in the garden and looks like they are just able to grow by themselves.
Design for a Silk Brocade, Unknown, c. 1750, From the collection of: Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
I really liked this flower design, because it was different to all the other paintings; it was originally a draft for a silk brocade, but now it is known as a piece of art.
Flower still life, Adolphe Monticelli, 1875, From the collection of: Van Gogh Museum
I chose this painting, because it was dark and mysterious, the flowers were lively, but the background had a darkness to it.
Basket of pansies, Vincent van Gogh, May 1887, From the collection of: Van Gogh Museum
I chose this painting by Van Gogh, because it showed the curves of the flower petals and had mainly the same colour pallet through the whole painting.
Vase with Chinese Asters and Gladioli, Vincent van Gogh, August 1886 - September 1886, From the collection of: Van Gogh Museum
This was a very clever painting, because it had been blurred, almost like looking through a n unfocused camera lense.
Field with Flowers near Arles, Vincent van Gogh, 1888, From the collection of: Van Gogh Museum
This painting shows a field of flowers ; Van Gogh has used the same colour pallet through out the painting,but the flowers stand out of the picture. That's why I liked this painting so much.
Grass and butterflies, Vincent van Gogh, May 1887 - July 1887, From the collection of: Van Gogh Museum
I liked this painting, because Van Gogh used many techniques to capture the painting at its best and show the softness of the colours and the picture. Although you cannot see the butterflies ver well, they add a certain excitement to the painting.
Tulip, Valentine Bartholomew, 1822, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
This is a simple tulip design that shows the colours of the petals and the angle the flower has been put at. This is a great drawing and shows what people can really do.
Bouquet in a Vase, Renoir, Pierre Auguste, 1878, From the collection of: Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields
I chose this particular painting as it is in soft focus and shows the different colours of the painting, although they almost look like they have blended in together.
Returning, Ide Yasuto, 2007, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
This is my favourite painting out of my gallery, because I love the colours and the simplicity . It also has a calm feeling as the woman and her dog are asleep.
Early Spring, Sakakibara Shiho, 1919, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
This is a great picture as it is shown in sepia and the two colours that really stand out are the red and the green of the leaves and flowers.
Girasoles, Fernando Botero, 1995, From the collection of: Museo Botero, Bogotá
This picture was cleverly painted as it almost looks like the painting Sunflowers at its first stages; and that's why I chose it.
Monochromatic Plum Blossoms, Sakakibara Shiho, 1966, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
This is a simple painting and mainly uses black and white colours. it uses a blochy design that creates a flower effect.
Japanese White-eye Dwelling in Snow, Sakakibara Shiho, 1947, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
This is a great picture and shows a curviture design of the branch and the simple colours of the painting. I liked this painting, because it looked a bit faded.
Magnolia Tree, Kobayashi Kokei, 1919, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
I really liked this painting, because it only uses three colours in the painting , red, white and black; this makes the painting more appealing and different to other flower paintings.
Peonies, Sakakibara Shiho, 1938, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
I liked this painting, because it included a small bird into the picture, which seemed to make the setting more realistic.
Japanese White-eyes and Plum Blossoms, Sakakibara Shiho, 1939, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
I thought this painting was different, because it used a method of painting that I hadn't really seen before. I also liked the birds in the picture.
Le Bassin des Nympheas, Claude Monet, 1904, From the collection of: Denver Art Museum
This is a spectacular painting, because you can see the reflection in the water, it also looks surreal and peaceful.
Yellow Irises, Claude Monet, c. 1914 - c. 1917, From the collection of: The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo
This was a simple painting that show the bright coloured flowers amongst the cold coloured background. I thought this painting was one of Monet's best.
Lily, Robert Mapplethorpe, 1984, From the collection of: SCAD Museum of Art
I loved this picture, because it was in black and white; so it showed more detail to the flower and no attention to the background.
Garden at Arles, Vincent van Gogh, July 1888, From the collection of: Gemeentemuseum
I think this is one of Vincent van Gogh's best paintings, as it is bright and full of life. It also shows different patternsused to create the flowers.
Jewel Rain, Matsuo Toshio, 2008, From the collection of: Adachi Museum of Art
This was a dark and blurry painting, which I liked because it almost looked like it could be in a dream, it also balances the colours in the painting perfectly.
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