American Romanticism

Here is my gallery of pictures that are filled with paintings with the theme of American Romanticism. Everyone of these artworks that I have chosen have made me feel some type of way. I hope you enjoy and have the same amount of admiration or photos as much as I did.

The Low Lighthouse, North Shields, Robert Salmon, 1828, From the collection of: Yale Center for British Art
This piece of artwork was appealing to me because of the amount of detail put into this whole painting. From the front of the painting to all the way to the back.
On the Beach, Thomas Doughty (1793-1856), 1827 - 1828, From the collection of: Albany Institute of History & Art
This piece of artwork makes me feel some type of way. This to me is a very spiritual piece of artwork, so this inspires me to be more religious in life.
Farmyard in Winter, George Henry Durrie, 1858, From the collection of: The White House
I am intrigued by this piece because of the exquisite details put into this piece. The details that were put into the barn houses,the animals,the snow and trees.
Approaching Storm: Beach near Newport, Martin Johnson Heade, about 1861 - 1862, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
This painting makes me realize how precious water is in life. Because of this devastating drought that we are currently in.
Distant View of the Mansfield Mountain, Vermont, John Frederick Kensett, 1849, From the collection of: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
This picture has a lot of detail. There is a lot of detail in the trees and in the grass and just basically everywhere. I give much props to Kensett because the details in picture are marvelous.
The Mill, Thomas Worthington Whittredge (American, b.1820, d.1910), 1852, From the collection of: Cincinnati Art Museum
I am fascinated with this artwork because of all the great colors and details put into the people and the water and also with the animals.
Kauterskill Falls, Sanford Gifford, 1846, From the collection of: SCAD Museum of Art
This painting is extremely fascinating because the artwork looks realistic. As if the artist went into the woods and took a picture of the waterfall.
Portrait of Fidelia Marshall, Charles Cromwell Ingham, ca. 1840, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
Sequoyah, Henry Inman, c. 1830, From the collection of: Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery
Daniel Boone, Chester Harding, 1820, From the collection of: Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery
Kiss Me and Youll Kiss the Lasses, Lilly Martin Spencer, 1856, From the collection of: Brooklyn Museum
Kee-mo-rá-nia, No English, a Dandy, George Catlin, 1830, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
On the Beach, Thomas Doughty (1793-1856), 1827 - 1828, From the collection of: Albany Institute of History & Art
Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Thomas Cole, 1828, From the collection of: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
The Indian's Vespers, Asher B. Durand, 1847, From the collection of: The White House
Morning, Looking East Over the Hudson Valley from the Catskill Mountains, Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900), 1848, From the collection of: Albany Institute of History & Art
Still Life with Fruit and Nuts, Robert Seldon Duncanson, 1848, From the collection of: National Gallery of Art, Washington DC
Wind River Country, Albert Bierstadt, 1860, From the collection of: Denver Art Museum
Mist in Kanab Canyon, Utah, Thomas Moran, 1892, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
Eagle Cliff, Franconia Notch, New Hampshire, Jasper Francis Cropsey, 1858, From the collection of: North Carolina Museum of Art
Still Life with Fruit, Severin Roesen, 1852, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
Luncheon Still Life, John F. Francis, ca. 1860, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
We Both Must Fade (Mrs. Fithian), Lilly Martin Spencer, 1869, From the collection of: Smithsonian American Art Museum
The Money Diggers, John Quidor, 1832, From the collection of: Brooklyn Museum
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