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Black-figure lekythos

Workshop of the Haimon Painter"circa 475 BC" - ""

Museum of Cycladic Art

Museum of Cycladic Art

Attic lekythos depicting a race between two chariots; a white column probably indicates the finish line. Although the design is rather poor, the charioteers are shown in vivid motion, successfully conveying their effort to win. The vessel is attributed to the workshop of the Haimon painter, a very productive "lekythos painter" who worked in the closing years of the black-figure style. Chariot races were a popular subject in ancient art. They were associated with the heroic past of Greece and the Olympian Gods. Hippios Poseidon was the protector of equestrian games. There were four kinds of chariot races: events for tethrippon (a chariot drawn by four horses), synoris (two-horse chariot), apene (a cart pulled by two mules), and chariot race for tethrippa drawn by foals. These contests were fascinating but at the same time dangerous. The main aim of the charioteers was to drive the horses into the inside lane of the track and turn first at the "nyssa" (a pillar set at the turning point). The distances covered by the horses during the equestrian contests varied from three to twelve circuits of the hippodrome. It was the owner of the horses and not the charioteer who was regarded as victor. Therefore, equestrian events could be won by females, who were otherwise excluded from the games.

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Details

  • Title: Black-figure lekythos
  • Creator: Workshop of the Haimon Painter
  • Date Created: "circa 475 BC" - ""
  • Read more: <a href="http://www.cycladic.gr/frontoffice/portal.asp?cpage=resource&cresrc=825&cnode=55&clang=1">Read more</a>
  • Provenance: Unknown
  • Physical Dimensions: h170 mm
  • Period: Classical period
  • Culture: Greek (Attic)
  • Type: lekythos
  • Rights: N.P. Goulandris Foundation - Museum of Cycladic Art, C. Politis Collection, no. 135, http://www.cycladic.gr/frontoffice/portal.asp?cpage=NODE&cnode=25&clang=1
  • External Link: Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, Greece
  • Medium: clay

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