Loading

Black-Figure Neck-Amphora (Storage Vessel): Herakles and Nemean Lion (A); Dionysos, Satyrs, and Maenads (B)

Painter of Berlin 1899 (Greek, Attic)515–510 BC

The Cleveland Museum of Art

The Cleveland Museum of Art
Cleveland, United States

The neck-amphora, one of the most popular vase shapes in Archaic Athens, provided painters with ample space for both figural and ornamental decoration. Herakles, the greatest of Greek heroes, performs his most famous deed on the obverse, wrestling the Nemean lion. His patron goddess Athena, together with his nephew Iolaos, holding the hero’s club, stand by. On the other side is an unrelated scene, showing the wine god Dionysos with dancing maenads and satyrs. Abundant ornament covers other areas: stylized lotus blossom and palmette chains on the neck; intricately linked palmettes and lotuses beneath each handle; and a key pattern, linked lotus buds, and rays on the lower body.

Download this artwork (provided by The Cleveland Museum of Art).
Learn more about this artwork.

Details

  • Title: Black-Figure Neck-Amphora (Storage Vessel): Herakles and Nemean Lion (A); Dionysos, Satyrs, and Maenads (B)
  • Creator: Painter of Berlin 1899 (Greek, Attic)
  • Date Created: 515–510 BC
  • Physical Dimensions: Overall: 39.8 cm (15 11/16 in.); Diameter: 29 cm (11 7/16 in.)
  • Provenance: The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
  • Type: Ceramic
  • Rights: CC0
  • External Link: https://clevelandart.org/art/1970.16
  • Medium: ceramic
  • Fun Fact: After Herakles strangled the Nemean lion, he wore its pelt as a protective trophy.
  • Department: Greek and Roman Art
  • Culture: Greece, Attic
  • Credit Line: Andrew R. and Martha Holden Jennings Fund
  • Collection: GR - Greek
  • Accession Number: 1970.16

Get the app

Explore museums and play with Art Transfer, Pocket Galleries, Art Selfie, and more

Recommended

Google apps