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The daughter of former slaves, Ida B. Wells sued the Chesapeake, Ohio, and Southwestern Railway in 1883 after being dragged from her seat for refusing to move to a segregated railcar. Her anger over this incident spurred her to begin contributing articles to black-owned newspapers; she became part owner and editor of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight in 1889. After three black businessmen were lynched in Memphis in 1892, Wells launched what became a four-decade-long anti-lynching crusade. She vigorously investigated other lynchings and published her groundbreaking treatise on the topic, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases.

Details

  • Title: Ida B. Wells-Barnett
  • Creator: Sallie E. Garrity
  • Date Created: c. 1893
  • Physical Dimensions: w9.8 x h13.9 cm (Image)
  • Type: Albumen silver print
  • Rights: National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution
  • External Link: https://npg.si.edu/object/npg_NPG.2009.36
  • Classification: Photograph

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