Loading

Photograph "Caselli telegram from Paris to LeHavre, c. 1867"

c. 1910

Museum for Communication Berlin, Museum Foundation Post and Telecommunication

Museum for Communication Berlin, Museum Foundation Post and Telecommunication
Berlin, Germany

The Italian Giovanni Caselli invented the so-called "Pantelegraph" in 1856. This allowed him to create line drawings (manuscripts and sketches). From 1863, the first public "teleautographic" connections were established in England (London/Liverpool) and from 1856 in France (Paris/Lyon and Paris/Le Havre). Allegedly, there was also a "Pantelegraph" in China in 1885. The message was written with non-electrically-conductive ink onto a metal plate. The "Pantelegraph" then scanned the different conductivity of the surfaces and transmitted the information to the receivers as surges of current. This reproduced the non-conductive areas in the form of a characteristic line pattern, which can be seen on this Caselli picture telegram.

Details

  • Title: Photograph "Caselli telegram from Paris to LeHavre, c. 1867"
  • Date Created: c. 1910
  • Location Created: Frankreich
  • Rights: © Museumsstiftung Post und Telekommunikation
  • Material: Fotografie

Get the app

Explore museums and play with Art Transfer, Pocket Galleries, Art Selfie, and more

Recommended

Google apps