Zhu Xi

Oct 18, 1130 - Apr 23, 1200

Zhu Xi, also known by his courtesy name Yuanhui, and self-titled Hui'an, was a Chinese calligrapher, historian, philosopher, politician, and writer of the Song dynasty. He was a Confucian scholar and influential Neo-Confucian in China. His contributions to Chinese philosophy including his editing of and commentaries to the Four Books, which later formed the curriculum of the civil service exam in Imperial China from 1313 to 1905; and his emphasis on the process of the "investigation of things" as well as his meditation as a method for self cultivation, fundamentally shaped the Chinese as well as the worldview for posterity.
He was a scholar with a wide learning in the classics, commentaries, histories and other writings of his predecessors. In his lifetime he was able to serve multiple times as an government official, although he avoided public office for most of his adult life. He also wrote, compiled and edited almost a hundred books and corresponded with dozens of other scholars. He acted as a teacher to groups of students, many of whom chose to study under him for years.
Show lessRead more
Wikipedia

Discover this historical figure

24 items

“If one peers into the mystery, the thai chi [taiji, supreme polarity] seems a chaotic and disorderly wilderness lacking all signs of an arranger…, yet the Li (fundamental pattern) of motion and rest, and of Yin and Yang, is fully contained within it.”

Zhu Xi
Oct 18, 1130 - Apr 23, 1200
Google apps