School of Fontainebleau

1528 - 1610

Term that encompasses work in a wide variety of media, including painting, sculpture, stuccowork and printmaking, produced from the 1530s to the first decade of the 17th century in France (e.g. The Nymph of Fontainebleau). It evokes an unreal and poetic world of elegant, elongated figures, often in mythological settings, as well as incorporating rich, intricate ornamentation with a characteristic type of strapwork. The phrase was first used by Adam von Bartsch in Le Peintre-graveur (21 vols, Vienna, 1803–21), referring to a group of etchings and engravings, some of which were undoubtedly made at Fontainebleau in France . More generally, it designates the art made to decorate the château of Fontainebleau, built from 1528 by Francis I and his successors, and by extension it covers all works that reflect the art of Fontainebleau. With the re-evaluation of MANNERISM in the 20th century, the popularity of the Fontainebleau school has increased hugely.
Show lessRead more
© Grove Art / OUP

Discover this art movement

10 items

Art MovementsSchool of Fontainebleau
Art MovementsSchool of Fontainebleau
Art MovementsSchool of Fontainebleau
Google apps