2013

RE.CREATE with Tate Britain: Photography

Tate Britain

Meet 500 years of British Art, interpreted by the world's leading creatives + you

A new Tate Britain will be unveiled on 19 November 2013. 

To celebrate we're asking leading figures from the worlds of cooking, fashion, poetry, film, photography, music and comedy to share the creative processes behind their own work, inspired by 500 years of British Art.

RE.CREATE with Tate Britain is a new partnership with Google.

We invite you to draw inspiration from 500 years of British Art, then recreate something new to share with friends on Google+, Facebook and Twitter with #tatebritain

Over the coming months we'll announce new themes and introduce new artworks for you to be inspired by

Photographer Miles Aldridge selected a painting by painter Mark Gertler from Tate Britain’s collection as the inspiration for his own stunning visual recreation. In this film we watch him at work as models pose languorously on a carousel.

Born in London in 1964, Aldridge studied illustration at art college, and briefly directed music videos before becoming a fashion photographer in the mid-90s. He has published his work in many influential magazines including Vogue Italia, American Vogue, Numéro, The New York Times and The New Yorker.

Guests Miles Aldridge and Simon Baker, join Miranda Sawyer and online contributors for a lively discussion about photography and art.

Watch the archived version of the 'Photography meets Art' Hangout On Air that took place on 30 October, 2013 at Tate Britain.

The Art of Photography

We asked three of Britain’s leading photographers - Don McCullin, Dorothy Bohm and Peter Fraser - to tell us what makes a great picture

Don McCullin is recognised as one of the most important living war photographers. He has covered events of global importance, including the Vietnam and Biafran wars for The Observer, and other publications, since the 1960s.

But in this film McCullin focuses on the pictures that don’t show acts of war, and why he prefers to be known for this type of work.

Prussian-born photographer Dorothy Bohm invites us into her London home as she discusses her life and work.


After fleeing to England as a child at the outset of the Second World War, photographer Dorothy Bohm studied photography at a Manchester college before moving to Hampstead in 1956.

Over the next three decades she built a reputation as one of Britain's leading photographic artists, earning particular acclaim for her images of street culture in London and Paris.

Peter Fraser has been at the forefront of colour photography as a fine art medium since the early 1980s, emerging alongside peers including Martin Parr and Paul Graham. Much of his work involves an almost obsessive focus on the small details of everyday life.  He talks about his approach to image-making, and why he feels his work expresses the mysterious scope and range of the unconscious mind.

Now we want you to be inspired. Please send us your art inspired photographs to ‘Photography meets 500 years of British Art’ via G+, Facebook and Twitter with #tatebritain.  We'll publish some of the best right here.

Coming soon: 

Throughout the coming months many names will be revealed 

Those confirmed include:

Fashion: Jonathan Saunders and Preen

Film: Mike Leigh and Christopher Nolan

Music: Everything Everything

Explore previous exhibitions: 

RE.CREATE with Tate Britain: Poetry

RE.CREATE with Tate Britain: Comedy

RE.CREATE with Tate Britain: Cooking

Meet 500 Years of British Art

Visit Tate Britain for more ideas and inspirations

http://www.tate.org.uk/visit/tate-britain/meet-tate-britain

Credits: Story

Creative Director — Jane Burton
Exhibit Producer — Alexey Moskvin
Film Producers — Sofie Roberts, Susan Doyon, NIck Aldridge
Film Production Team — Tate Media

Credits: All media
The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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