"The National Park Service is America's storyteller, and we know that there are very, very important parts of our story that have yet to be told," said Sally Jewell, the secretary of the Department of the Interior, who was joined by the director of the National Park Service, Jonathan Jarvis.On May 30, 2014, Sec. Jewell stood outside the Stonewall Inn in New York City and announced private funding for a new theme study to identify places and events associated with the story of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) Americans. A few days later, on June 10, 2014, a panel of LGBTQ scholars and community activists met in Washington, DC. For more on this, go to https://www.nps.gov/articles/lgbtqheritageadminhist.htm

NYC Mayor Bill DeBlasio, Comm Joshua Laird, Sen. Jerry Nadler, Supt Shirley McKinney_DOI Secretary Sally Jewell_NPS Director Jon Jarvis_Senior Advisor to Pres Obama__Designation Ceremony_June 24_2016, From the collection of: Stonewall National Monument
What Is It?
Stonewall Uprising, which took place over a span of 5 days starting on June 28, 1969, is considered a watershed moment in the history of the LGBTQ civil rights movement. Stonewall was designated a National Monument in June 2016 in order to commemorate the event and honor all of those who have stood for LGBTQ rights before and since.
Christopher Park, From the collection of: Stonewall National Monument
The Monument
Stonewall National Monument is located in Christopher Park, Greenwich Village, NY, across the street from the Stonewall Inn. Christopher Park served as the location for much of the demonstrations and protests during the the Stonewall Uprising in 1969.  The monuments are modeled after actual participants of the 5-day uprising in 1969. 
Where is  it Located?
The Stonewall Inn, a bar located in Greenwich Village, New York City, was the scene of an uprising against police repression that led to a key turning point in the struggle for the civil rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Americans. In a pattern of harassment of LGBT establishments, the New York City police raided the Stonewall Inn in the early hours of Saturday, June 28, 1969. The reaction of the bar’s patrons and neighborhood residents that assembled in the street was not typical of these kinds of raids. Instead of dispersing, the crowd became increasingly angry and began chanting and throwing objects as the police arrested the bar's employees and patrons. Reinforcements were called in by the police, and for several hours they tried to clear the streets while the crowd fought back. The initial raid and the riot that ensued led to six days of demonstrations and conflicts with law enforcement outside the bar, in nearby Christopher Park, and along neighboring streets. At its peak, the crowds included several thousand people. The events of Stonewall, as the uprising is most commonly referred to, marked a major change in the struggle for "homophile rights" in the U.S., with lesbian women, gay men, bisexual and transgender people beginning to vocally and assertively demand their civil rights. Stonewall is regarded by many as the single most important catalyst for the dramatic expansion of the LGBT civil rights movement. The riots inspired LGBT people throughout the country to organize and within two years of Stonewall, LGBT rights groups had been started in nearly every major city in the U.S. Stonewall was, as historian Lillian Faderman wrote, "the shot heard round the world...crucial because it sounded the rally for the movement.” Today, the site of the uprisings in Greenwich Village is recognized as a National Historic Landmark (NHL) by the National Park Service and is considered significant under Criterion 1 because of its association with events that outstandingly represent the struggle for civil rights in America. The NHL includes the bar, Christopher Park, and the streets where the events of June 28-July 3, 1969, occurred. The Stonewall Inn is located at 51-53 Christopher Street, New York City, New York and is open to the public.
Christopher Park, June 13 2016., From the collection of: Stonewall National Monument
What Happened in 1969
“There was no out, there was just in.” Before the 1960s almost  everything about living openly as a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) person was illegal. New York City laws against homosexual activities were particularly harsh. The Stonewall Uprising on June 28, 1969 is a milestone in the quest for LGBT civil rights and provided momentum for a movement.                                    The events of Stonewall, as the uprising is most commonly referred to, marked a major change in the struggle for "homophile rights" in the U.S., with lesbian women, gay men, bisexual and transgender people beginning to vocally and assertively demand their civil rights. Stonewall is regarded by many as the single most important catalyst for the dramatic expansion of the LGBT civil rights movement. The riots inspired LGBT people throughout the country to organize and within two years of Stonewall, LGBT rights groups had been started in nearly every major city in the U.S. Stonewall was, as historian Lillian Faderman wrote, "the shot heard round the world...crucial because it sounded the rally for the movement.
Pride Parade 2018, From the collection of: Stonewall National Monument
Rangers March Proudly
National Park Rangers from parks nationwide converge on NYC to participate in the annual NYC PRIDE Parade. 
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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not represent the views of the institutions whose collections include the featured works or of Google Arts & Culture.
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