Impressions: the Honolulu Printmakers at Shangri La

In 2004, the Honolulu Printmakers were invited onsite to explore the Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design. The museum had only recently been opened to the public following its transformation from the previously-private home of philanthropist and collector Doris Duke. This visit provided the artists with creative inspiration for artworks later created offsite: 21 prints by 22 artists, the series on display in this exhibition.

Hunters at the Edge, Gina Bacon Kerr, 2004, Provenant de la collection : Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design
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Shangri-La (2004), Timothy R ContrerasShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The collaboration fourteen years ago was a key moment in the history of Shangri La, as the open access for the Honolulu Printmakers artists predated our well-known Artists-in-Residence program. 

False Words Spoken (2004), David B SmithShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Shangri-la Secrets (2004), Anne IronsShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

These prints therefore record the first-known artistic responses to Shangri La as a public institution, made even richer by their production by, and connections to, artists from the local community in Honolulu. 

Malek Allah (2004), Saba PolakovicShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Her Sanctuary (2004), Pat EkstrandShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

2018 marks the 90th anniversary of the founding of the Honolulu Printmakers and this exhibition honors this early collaboration between the organization and Shangri La, and suggests how artists may enrich the self-understanding of a public institution.

Reflections of Shangri La (2004), Marcia MorseShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The artists’ explorations of light, pattern, and color provide a wealth of narrative and interpretative voices and a visual language which highlights, explores, and continues to activate and enliven our landscapes, structures, and collections.

 

Meditation Garden (2004), Christine Harris-AmosShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Several of the artists explored the interplay of light and shadow on the surfaces of the architecture of Shangri La: dappled figures, refracted prisms, and leafy shadows all sculpt and ornament the walls, courtyard, and rooflines of the museum. 

Duke's Shangri La (2004), Kimberly M ChaiShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Architectural decoration frames these artistic explorations, providing a supporting structure as well as visual contrast. 

Shangri-la Memories (2004), Elizabeth NakoaShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The restrained, cool palette of blacks, blues, and whites allows the viewer’s focus to concentrate on the light - and what it conceals, as well as highlights.

Forget Me Not (2004), Joseph SingerShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The Gateway (2004), Constance VallisShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The layering of patterns - both the geometric tessellations common in the arts of the Islamic world, as well as those from nature - appealed to many of the artists, who explored these elements in what Laura Smith noted was “an ambivalent definition of inside and outside space.” 

Doris (2004), Louise BarrShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

West Eats Meat (2005), Jared WickwareShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The wide variety of subjects include the architectural niche of a chinikhana, the sculpted shapes of molded tiles, and natural elements - from the gardens and lawns of the museum, to a whimsical textile-embossed pineapple.

Acrobat (2004), Maja ClarkShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Forbidden Wishes Turn to Stone (2004), Donna BroderShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

The palettes of the artists frequently reference the rich mix of colors at Shangri La: the cobalts and turquoises of the glazed tiles, the jewel tones of the stained glass windows, or the earthy warmth of the embroidered textiles - all of which provide what Marcia Morse described as a “wealth of sensory pleasures.” 

Ruby Doris (2004), Chris MittsShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Yet these bright and vibrant colors are offset by the carefully chosen swatches of black, grey, and white which serve as a grounding visual juxtaposition to these kaleidoscopic tones.

Lahilahi Sings on (2004), Tamara MoanShangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design

Crédits : histoire

Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design
Honolulu, Hawai'i

Shangri La is a museum for learning about the global culture of Islamic art and design through exhibitions, digital and educational initiatives, public tours and programs, and community partnerships.

Shangri La Museum of Islamic Art, Culture & Design is a program of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation through the Doris Duke Foundation For Islamic Art.

Crédits : tous les supports
Il peut arriver que l'histoire présentée ait été créée par un tiers indépendant et qu'elle ne reflète pas toujours la ligne directrice des institutions, répertoriées ci-dessous, qui ont fourni le contenu.
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