Step Into the Wild with Mohamed Amin

Get a glimpse into the extraordinary wildlife in Africa through the lens of photojournalist Mohamed 'Mo' Amin.

By Mohamed Amin Foundation

Elephant by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

Take a walk on the wild side

Kenyan photojournalist Mohamed Amin was passionate about animals and nature. He would spend most of his spare time in game parks. He would always bring his camera in order to document the extraordinary scenes. 

Martial eagles by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

“I spend three days in a game park. Sure it’s a holiday, but I come in with 60 rolls of film. Every one of those pictures can sell. That’s not the initial motivation to get me there. I go because my family wants a holiday. I say, ‘Fine, I’ll come along with you, but I can’t go without my cameras because I would just be bored to death’.”
Mohamed Amin

Lion by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

“I probably enjoy the trip more than them because, you know, they’ve seen a lion and they aren’t bothered about seeing another one. But I am. I love studying all animals in their natural habitat."
Mohamed Amin

Giraffes by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

“I probably enjoy the trip more than them because, you know, they’ve seen a lion and they aren’t bothered about seeing another one. But I am. I love studying all animals in their natural habitat."
Mohamed Amin

Mohamed Amin at Emperor Haile Selassie's palace by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

Chasing lions and escaping elephants

Mohamed Amin was also commissioned to document the fascinating stories of Kenya's Rhino Man, Ahmed the Elephant and the life of George Adamson. 

The Rhino Man (1987) by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

Kenya's Rhino Man

Mohamed Amin photographed Michael Werikhe, a Kenyan auto plant security supervisor by profession who became a world-renowned conservationist. He championed the cause of the endangered Rhinoceros and raised over USD1 million for Rhino conservation in sponsored walks from 1982 through 1993, covering nearly 5,000 kilometres in Kenya, Europe, the United States and Taiwan.

The Rhino Man (1987) by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation







Michael is remembered around the world for his decade-long struggle to highlight the plight of the African Black Rhino and other endangered species. His passionate efforts are still prevalent today. His work continues through many initiatives like the Michael Werikhe Trust. 

The Legend who climbed hills backwards by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

Ahmed the Elephant: The King of Marsabit

In the 1960s and 1970s there was an elephant known to many as “The King Of Marsabit”, who lived in the forests of the Marsabit National Reserve on a mountain rising out of the scrublands of northern Kenya. This Elephant was named Ahmed. His tusks, the longest and heaviest in Africa, weighed over 150lbs each.

The Legend who climbed hills backwards by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

President Kenyatta placed Ahmed under his protection by Presidential Decree, an unparalleled occurrence in the history of the country and the only elephant to be declared a living monument. In 1974, Ahmed passed away at the age of 55. President Kenyatta declared Ahmed be preserved at the Nairobi National Museum for future generations.

Ahmed, the elephant by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

“I remember my Dad telling me how they were charged by Ahmed as they took what turned out to be the last pictures of the King. They had been following him on foot all day and, when his patience with them eventually ran out, he charged the camera team."
Salim Amin

The Legend who climbed hills backwards by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

"My father and his colleague Peter Moll were running away and decided to run on opposite sides of a huge tree, not realizing they were still attached together by the sound cables and Peter was whipped back around the tree narrowly missing the giant tusks!" 
Salim Amin

Game Warden George Adamson (1964) by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

George Adamson: Baba Ya Simba

No one knew better the language and lives of lions, or loved them more than George Adamson. Changing wildlife conservation worldwide, George is often referred to as “Baba ya Simba” (Father of Lions) for his remarkable efforts. 

Game Warden George Adamson (1964) by Mohamed AminMohamed Amin Foundation

“Who will now care for the animals, for they cannot look after themselves? Are there young men and women who are willing to take on this charge? Who will raise their voices, when mine is carried away on the wind, to plead their case?”
George Adamson

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