ICORP on the Road Initiative

Learn about ICORP On The Road, an initiative that was launched by ICOMOS-ICORP and YTU TA-MIR in 2018. The initiative continues to share inspiring stories of post-disaster recovery of cultural heritage from around the world via a documentary series.

By ICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Why is the "ICORP on the road project¨ so important for ICOMOS & the communities being documented? (Zeynep Gül ünal) (2020/2020) by Larissa Ide & Mario SantanaICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Why is this Project so Important for ICOMOS and Communities?

Zeynep Gül Ünal, ICORP Vice President & Board Member explains why the ICORP on the Road project is important to ICOMOS and the communities involved.

What does it mean to prepare for risk within heritage sites? (Zeynep Gül ünal) (2020/2020) by Larissa Ide & Mario SantanaICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

What does it mean to prepare for risk within heritage sites?

Zeynep Gül Ünal explains the answer given her experience and background with risk preparedness.

The Sacred Valley of Kathmandu (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

The Sacred Valley of Kathmandu

In 2015 an earthquake hit the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal (UNESCO WH 1979) and damaged the 7 monument zones. The Valley is home to monuments that have allowed the members to maintain their beliefs, traditions, and rituals in places they created for many centuries.

Sharing the first-hand experiences (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Sharing First-Hand Experiences

In the immediate aftermath, local people and heritage protectors valiantly salvaged fragments of their temples, traditional houses, and communal buildings. The first episode of this series, "Reconnecting Sacred Valley Kathmandu", tells a story of people saving their heritage.

A thrilling discovery for the World (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

How Heritage Places Come to Life

"Mithras Metting Back With Daylight" tells the inspiring tale of how excavations done by archaeologists brought the abandoned archaeological site of Zerzevan Castle, located in Diyarbakır, Turkey, to life (UNESCO WH Tentative List 2020).

Re-establishing Connections (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Re-establishing Connections

The excavation at the site of Zerzevan Castle provided a link between the past and future of the site, and also created an opportunity of communication between generations who inhabit the nearby settlements. (See the full episode.)

UNESCO World Heritage Site Timbuktu (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

UNESCO World Heritage Site Timbuktu

Home to Koranic Sankore University, it was a spiritual/intellectual centre of Africa in the 15th & 16th centuries. Its three religious buildings, Djingareyber, Sankore, and Sidi Yahya Mosques (UNESCO WH 1988) have played a great role in the propagation of Islam throughout Africa.

What Disaster Occurred Here?

In 2012, the historical buildings and priceless manuscripts that constitute the collective memory of Timbuktu were severely damaged by the targeted destruction of terrorist groups.

Recovery as a ritual (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Who are the Heroes?

The Sidi Yahya Mosque is being repaired by Chief Mason M. Alhousseini Traoré and his team. Heritage heroes fearlessly resisted when terrorists sieged the city and destroyed sacred spaces, trying to erase Africa’s precious manuscripts that date back thousands of years.

Taking action today for the inheritance of centuries (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Taking Action Today for the Inheritance of Centuries

In Swat Valley of Pakistan, Gandhara, Kushan, Hindu, and Muslim cultures existed together through history. Cultural heritage was targeted and damaged by terrorist attacks including the Jahanabad Buddha Rock Carving, one of the most revered sites for Buddhist pilgrims. 

How is Heritage Recovered Post-Disasters?

"They Didn’t Just Come For The Lands" episode (behind the scenes) tells the story of community members and professionals ensuring that their multilayered heritage continues by evacuating museum artefacts during the attacks and by taking responsibility in the recovery process.

Sharing responsibility (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

How Does Sharing Responsibility Make a Difference?

Fauzia Qureshi, president of ICOMOS Pakistan, was interviewed about her experiences on how the community came together to safeguard their heritage. They took responsibility after devastating attacks aimed to destroy properties, recalling the deep rooted history of their lands.

Passing the awareness on to the young generations (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

How to Engage Younger Generations

School teacher Mehnaz Khaliq was interviewed in Barikot, the Ancient Bazira. The people of Pakistan are aware that the way to preserving their heritage depends on the education of younger minds. Students are encouraged to visit archaeological sites to learn about their culture.

Ghost heritage (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

The Story of a Ghost Town

On November 5th 2015, the Mariana dam in Minas Gerais, Brazil, used for the iron mines, collapsed and caused a disaster that severely harmed creatures and natural and cultural properties. The historical settlements are now abandoned by mandate, resembling ghost towns.

“Like losing a loved one...” (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Like Losing a Loved One

The mine waste travelled 600 km into the Atlantic Ocean, making it the biggest dam disaster in 100 years. As Chief Gao states, when the disaster hit and damaged the Doce River, for the Krenak Tribe it was "like losing a loved one."

Things that we are able to mend and the ones that we are not (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Things that We are Able to Mend and Ones that We are Not

The experts are continuing to work diligently for the recovery of the salvaged artefacts. Thanks to their efforts, preservation of the tangible heritage will be managed, but the recovery of nature will take a long time.

Silence (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Who's Heritage is it and Who Protects it?

The Mosque, Tomb, and Dargah in Rathar Chathar has no function since the Muslims left the area. Maintenance and restoration are taken on by the Sikh community who inhabit the settlement. The local community is taking care of the heritage of the "other" as service.

Waiting for the Sacred (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

Sacred Heritage Erasing Barriers

The government has made the holy site of Kartarpur, Pakistan accessible to the pilgrims from India without requiring visas. The shrine marks the final resting place of Guru Nanak, the founding Guru of the Sikh faith and has immense significance to the Sikh community.

Border View (21st Century) by ICORP-On The Road InitiativeICOMOS - International Council on Monuments and Sites

What Awaits Across the Border?

Across the border is the holy shrine for the Sikhs in Kartarpur. Sikh pilgrims go to the location to pay their respects in memory of their Guru.

Credits: Story


ICORP-On The Road Project owned by: ICOMOS - ICORP - YTU TA-MIR.ICOMOS Canada and Carleton University

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The story featured may in some cases have been created by an independent third party and may not always represent the views of the institutions, listed below, who have supplied the content.
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